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Iran and Christianity are not typically associated with one another in the modern period. However, in the context of the greater historical narrative, a connection becomes apparent, a montage showing that Christianity in Iran includes ethnic Iranian Christians from Assyrian and Armenian backgrounds as well as Western missionaries. Western missionaries came to Iran to convert Iranians, including ethnic Iranian Christians. In their efforts, their activity played a role in Iranian state and society. This paper examines the connection between the government and the Western missionary in the modern period, suggesting the influence was not completely positive.

In: Iran and the Caucasus

six are the introduction and conclusion, respectively. Chapter two pro- vides an overview of Iranian attitude toward Christianity. It addresses the history of Christianity in Iran and notes some of the Muslim dynas- ties that helped Iran connect with Christianity (Safavids, with the Arme- nian

In: Iran and the Caucasus

the middle of the second century . . .” (Moffett 1992 :72). An organized, Christian Church has been present in what is now Iran from the third century, if not earlier. 1 The long history of Christianity in Iran prior to the twentieth century is not the concern of this article, however. By the

In: Mission Studies
Author: Sergey Minov

members of the Church of the East, until recently often referred to as “Nestorians.” 4 For a general introduction to the history of Christianity in Iran during late antiquity, see Asmussen 1983; Herman 2019; the most comprehensive treatment remains Labourt 1904. On the beginnings of Christianity

In: Memory and Identity in the Syriac Cave of Treasures
Author: Sergey Minov

mimicry and hybridity, proved to be particularly useful. This approach to the study of cultural production in situations of competition and inequalities of power enables students of Syriac Christianity in Iran to be more attentive to how this subaltern group’s self-representation was shaped by the

In: Memory and Identity in the Syriac Cave of Treasures

than their coreligionists in the Roman world. During the Sasanians (224-651 A.D.), the Christians in general were tolerated by the majority of the kings of this dynasty, although in different periods there were also facts of severe persecutions of Christianity in Iran. The book gives valuable

In: Iran and the Caucasus
Author: Neven Vukic

, to the historical presence of Orthodox Christianity in Iran and the worship of martyrs in Islam and Christian Orthodoxy (‘9th Meeting of Joint Russian-Iranian Commission for Orthodoxy-Islam Dialogue Takes Place in Tehran | The Russian Orthodox Church’, https://mospat.ru/en/2014/08/27/news107162

In: Exchange
Author: Sergey Minov

CT ’s author with this particular faction of Syriac-speaking Christianity in Iran. One of them is the appearance of imagery characteristic of radical Miaphysite Christology, espoused by some followers of Julian of Halicarnassus, in the best manuscripts of CT . The presence of the Julianists in

In: Memory and Identity in the Syriac Cave of Treasures