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of the Convention on the Rights of the Child ( crc ), comprising Articles 6 through 40, lists the substantive rights recognised for children. These rights include civil, political, economic, social, and cultural rights, with one specific article devoted to children’s right to health. The crc does

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
Author: Ellen Desmet

are identified, which illustrate the pressing issues revolving around (the rights of) young persons/youth. From various angles, there appears to be an ambiguous relationship between the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and young persons. Also, the target groups of youth

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
Author: Aoife Nolan

the Child (ComRC/the Committee) has praised such tools in its work and has actively promoted their usage. Troublingly, however, there are serious shortcomings in the Committee’s approach to the ESR standards enshrined in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which threaten to impact upon

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
Resource Mobilization in Low-Income Countries
Editor: James R. Himes
This book considers one of the main umbrella articles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Article 4, dealing with the concept of the obligations of the States Parties to meet their commitments `to the maximum extent of their available resources and, where needed, within the framework of international cooperation'. The importance is emphasized of a broad interpretation of societal `resources', going well beyond the severely limited finances of governments in most developing countries and extending both to the international (official and non-governmental) levels and to the expanding civil societies of these nations. `Resources' are broadly defined to include human, technological, cultural and organizational capabilities as well as conventional economic resources. The thematic chapters give many examples of how such `resources' can be effectively mobilized for children, including the areas of education, health, nutrition and child labour.
This book provides a commentary on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, which was adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations on 20 November 1989. Part One contains a general introduction to the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and deals with matters such as the drafting history, the contents, direct application, horizontal effects, limitations, the Committee on the Rights of the Child, and the Convention's final provisions. Part Two contains an article-by-article commentary, the aim of which is not to give an interpretation of the precise nature and scope of States parties' obligations but, rather, to identify the materials, or sources, which provide guidance in that regard. In the identification of such materials, attention has been paid to the general rules of treaty interpretation, as set forth in the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties.
Author: Tiny Vandewiele
This volume constitutes a commentary on the First Optional Protocol to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, dealing with the involvement of children in armed conflicts. It is part of the series, A Commentary on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, which provides an article by article analysis of all substantive, organizational and procedural provisions of the CRC and its two Optional Protocols. For every article, a comparison with related human rights provisions is made, followed by an in-depth exploration of the nature and scope of State obligations deriving from that article. The series constitutes an essential tool for actors in the field of children’s rights, including academics, students, judges, grassroots workers, governmental, non- governmental and international officers. The series is sponsored by the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office.
This volume constitutes a commentary on Article 21 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. It is part of the series, A Commentary on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, which provides an article by article analysis of all substantive, organizational and procedural provisions of the CRC and its two Optional Protocols. For every article, a comparison with related human rights provisions is made, followed by an in-depth exploration of the nature and scope of State obligations deriving from that article. The series constitutes an essential tool for actors in the field of children’s rights, including academics, students, judges, grassroots workers, governmental, non-governmental and international officers. The series is sponsored by the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office.
Taking Stock after 25 Years and Looking Ahead
In 2014 the world’s most widely ratified human rights treaty, one specifically for children, reached the milestone of its twenty-fifth anniversary. The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child was adopted after the fall of the Berlin Wall, and in the time since then it has entered a new century, reshaping laws, policies, institutions and practices across the globe, along with fundamental conceptions of who children are, their rights and entitlements, and society’s duties and obligations to them.
Yet despite its rapid entry into force worldwide, there are concerns that the Convention remains a high-level paper treaty without the traction on the ground needed to address ever-continuing violations of children’s rights. This book, based on papers from the conference ‘25 Years CRC’ held by the Department of Child Law at Leiden University, draws together a rich collection of research and insight by academics, practitioners, NGOs and other specialists to reflect on the lessons of the past 25 years, take stock of how international rights find their way into children’s lives at the local level, and explore the frontiers of children’s rights for the 25 years ahead.