speech concludes a ‘set-piece’ that begins with the Corinthians’ final speech ( i .120.-124) and whose bridge is the so-called digression on Cylon, Pausanias and Themistocles, three men believed either to pursue tyranny or to aid its imposition on the Greeks ( i .125-139). Our sense of this section of

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought

Following Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and Blade Runner, television series Battlestar Galactica dealt extensively with the notion of the humanoid cyborg, or as they are called in the series – Cylons. This paper first establishes that in the world created by the series no real difference exists between the human and the artificial, the only separation between the two groups is a discursive one. This amounts to an understanding of humanity as no more and no less than an abstract idea, one that cannot be empirically differentiated from artificial life. Then, the paper asks why the Cylons would want to resemble humans and suggests that human creations – be they robots or works of art – will always have in them a trace of human values and ideas. In the same way reason cannot be attacked except by reason’s instruments and formations, human art cannot comment on reality except by humanist values.

In: The (Un)Certain Future of Empathy in Posthumanism, Cyberculture and Science Fiction

local noble named Cylon, whose father-in-law was tyrant at Megara, occupied the Acropolis in an attempt to set himself as tyrant at Athens; when the coup failed, his supporters took refuge in the sanctuary of Athena and were starved into submission, whereupon they were massacred at the hands of the

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought

[German version] (Ἀλκμαιονίδαι; Alkmaionídai). Influential aristocratic family, which in archaic times and across several generations played a prominent role in the history of  Athens.  Megacles [1], the first verifiable A., defeated around 630 BC  Cylon's attempt to achieve the tyrannis. The

In: Brill's New Pauly Online

[German version] The killing of the supporters of the aspiring tyrant  Cylon in the sanctuary of Athena Polias around 630 BC was regarded as a religious outrage. The family of the responsible archon, that of the Alcmaeonid  Megacles, was punished with banishment (Hdt. 5,71; Thuc. 1,126). The

In: Brill's New Pauly Online

[German version] (τυραννίδος γραφή; tyrannídos graphḗ). Popular action for tyranny ( tyrannis ). Plutarch's report of the amnesty law of Solon [1] provides evidence that atimia (cf. also time (1)) for tyranny was already current before Solon (Plut. Solon 19). Those supporters of Cylon [1] who fled

In: Brill's New Pauly Online

( Cylon [1]) and the subsequent curse of the Alcmaeonids (Hdt. 5,71; Thuc. 1,126). Peisistratids Develin, 30f. PA 9688 Traill, PAA 636340. [German version] Grandson of M. [1], son of Alcmaeon [3], the...

In: Brill's New Pauly Online

This article considers the state of research on the two-way relationship of causation between politics and war in ancient Athens from the attempted coup of Cylon in 632 BC to the violent overthrow of its democracy by theMacedonians in 322. Also canvassed is how a closer integration of Ancient History and Political Science can enhance the research of each discipline into the important problem of democracy’s effect on war-making. Classical Athens is well known for its full development of popular politics and its cultural revolution, which clearly was a dependent variable of the democracy. By contrast, few are aware of its contemporaneous military revolution, which saw the classical Athenians intensify the waging of war and gain an unrivalled record of military success and innovation. Although a prima facie case exists for these military changes being due to popular government, ancient historians have conducted very little research on the impact of democracy on war. In the last decade our discipline has also witnessed the collapse of the longstanding understanding of the affect of military changes on political developments in ancient Greece, which means we can no longer explain why Athenian democracy emerged and was consolidated during the classical period. For the sake of ameliorating this situation the article proposes new directions and a social-science approach for research into the military and non-military causes of Athenian democratisation and the relative effect of Athenian democracy on warfare. At a time when established democracies face complex challenges of foreign policy such research into the case study of ancient Athens is of real contemporary relevancy.

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought
Author: Teresa Botelho

Warnings about the consequences of human hubris and overreach in the creation of artificial life, going back to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, tap into an undercurrent of cautionary myths and narratives that rework the Promethean allegory and predict that the forbidden creation will eventually destroy its creator. Contemporary imagination, shaped by the familiarity (if not complete understanding) of the tenets of the Singularity Theory, has gradually re-modulated the discourse about the intelligent robotic other, moving away from an anti-technology telos, to consider new possibilities of connectivity and re-examine the boundaries of the human. This chapter examines a science fiction television series, the millennial Battlestar Galactica (2004-9), and discusses how it maps out the pathways into consciousness and individuality of the anthropomorphic Cylons, which have evolved from the earlier bio-mechanical models designed for military purposes. It will discuss how humans understand them as radical others unable to transcend the boundaries of their mechanical selves, and why this failure of imagination at the core of the devastating conflict between the species is gradually overcome by the facts of the Cylons’ new embodied existence, when they become ‘skinjobs’ with flesh and bone that feels and hurts, undistinguishable from that of humans. The mapping of this process of recognition of a kind of sameness in a body that feels will be discussed in terms of the phenomenological concept of the ‘lived body’, a hypothesis that teases the imaginative constructions of self-sustained artificial intelligence and evokes some of the contemporary debates about ethics and robotics.

In: The (Un)Certain Future of Empathy in Posthumanism, Cyberculture and Science Fiction