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Author: Oliver Bakewell

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/187254608X346024 African Diaspora 1 (2008) 5-27 www.brill.nl/afdi African Diaspora In Search of the Diasporas within Africa Oliver Bakewell * International Migration Institute, University of Oxford, oliver.bakewell@qeh.ox.ac.uk Abstract In the

In: African Diaspora
Author: Dominic Pasura

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/187254608X346060 African Diaspora 1 (2008) 86-109 www.brill.nl/afdi African Diaspora Gendering the Diaspora: Zimbabwean Migrants in Britain Dominic Pasura, PhD Department of Sociology, University of Warwick, Coventry, d

In: African Diaspora

THE SOGDIAN TRADE DIASPORA IN EAST TURKESTAN DURING THE SEVENTH AND EIGHTH CENTURIES BY JONATHAN KARAM SKAFF* Abstract Evidence from Chinese documents supports the hypothesis that Sogdians dominated Silk Road trade in East Turkestan during the seventh and eighth centuries. The merchants lived

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient
Author: Kishan Rana

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2009 DOI: 10.1163/187119109X455955 Th e Hague Journal of Diplomacy 4 (2009) 361-372 brill.nl/hjd India’s Diaspora Diplomacy Kishan S. Rana * B-33 IFS Apartments, Mayur Vihar-I, Delhi 110 091, India kishanrana@gmail.com Received: 6 April 2009; revised: 23 April

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
A Journal of Transnational Africa in a Global World
Editor-in-Chief: Karel Arnaut
This scholarly journal seeks to understand how African cultures and societies shape and are shaped by historical and current diasporic and transnational movements. Contrary to assuming 'Africa' as a bounded geographical entity and the African diaspora as a single imagined community, the journal charts uncovered territories and entangled histories of plural diasporas and transnational movements from, to and within Africa. These include, but are not limited to, the Transatlantic, the Indian Ocean, the Middle East as well as Europe and the former socialist countries of the European continent.

By focusing on when and how diasporas are produced and lived, diasporic connections are claimed, and transnational engagements evolve, the journal fosters a view on the ways in which these movements are navigated by people, networks, communities and states in historical, political and socio-cultural terms. This journal pursues placing at the centre of its attention the diasporians' and migrants' own experiences and expressions of these interlocking forms of mobility. Providing an academic context for the interpolation of the ways in which diasporic and transnational movements reinforce, negotiate or negate one another forms the core of the interdisciplinary approach this journal fosters. The ways in which the diversity of these flows subsequently produce mediations of contact, contest or conflict vis-à-vis the social fabric of sending and receiving situations and within transnational networks is elementary to the critical social theory the journal's academic debate is promoting. Issues of boundary making and crossing, belonging and citizenship, kinship and family configurations, religious ritual and symbolism, popular expressions and public culture, economic initiative and political agency form the heart of the diversity of these mediations.

The journal therefore encourages the submission of articles that are groundbreaking in their empirically founded re-conceptualizations of this intellectual terrain. The journal publishes peer reviewed articles based on original research, short notes and communications, and book reviews. Occasionally it will produce thematic issues. It is the journal's policy to encourage publication by junior scholars and to provide a platform for discussion and exchange relevant to policy. The journal is bi-lingual and welcomes contributions both in English and French. All articles will have abstracts in both languages.

From 2012 - 2014 this is a full Open Access journal, which means that all articles are freely available, ensuring maximum, worldwide dissemination of content. For more information please contact the journal: afdi@brill.com.

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Memory, Movement, and Modernities across Hemispheres
Series Editors:
Richard T. Chu, University of Massachusetts
Augusto F. Espiritu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Mariam Lam, University of California, Riverside

For some time now, studies on Southeast Asians have often situated the experiences of these peoples within the territorial boundaries of their countries and within the regional framework of Southeast Asia. Geographically fixed to the Philippines, Thailand, Burma, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Indonesia, Brunei, East Timor, and Singapore, Southeast Asia emerges, as critical area studies underscore, as a site marked by multivalent politics, histories, and cultures. The processes of globalization, neoliberalism, and war have unmoored such fixities in the Eastern as much as in the Western Hemispheres, causing tectonic shifts in the constructions of memory, massive population movements and migrations, and ever new projects and worldings responding to various regimes of the “modern.” Whereas Southeast Asian studies may remain regionally focused, Southeast Asian American studies must increase its focus on the understudied complex, transnational flows and manifold expressions of the Southeast Asian diasporic experience.

Attendant to the rise of the Southeast Asian diasporas, Global Southeast Asian Diasporas (SEAD) provides a peer-reviewed forum for studies that specifically investigate the histories and experiences of Southeast Asian diasporic subjects across hemispheres. We especially invite studies that critically focus on the Southeast Asian experience from a transnational, comparative, and international perspective. SEAD welcomes submissions from a wide array of disciplinary fields (including history, sociology, political science, cultural studies, literary studies, and anthropology, among others) that innovatively interrogate themes such as refugees, political asylum, gender/sexuality, colonialism, globalization, empire, nation/nationalism, ethnicity, and transnationalism.

Manuscripts should be at least 90,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations, tables, and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the Publisher, Chunyan Shu.