Author: Li Ruohui

“How is the meaning of the Dao to be understood?” To answer this question, we should not make indiscreet remarks outside of the framework of Laozi’s thought; rather, we should enter the system, helping Laozi to establish a philosophical system on the Dao. Such an establishment is equivalent to that of a logical system of Laozi’s philosophy. We consider the presentation of Laozi’s thought as unverified propositions, and the purpose of this essay is to expound on these propositions and make them philosophy in a strict sense: The Dao that can be talked about is not Dao anymore, and while “the Dao” seems to have its name, it actually does not. Names are also particular things. The Dao is neither a name nor a thing; instead, the Dao implies nonexistence. Nonexistence means the possibility of the being of all things, and all these things are the manifestation of the Dao, thus nonexistence is also existence. Things are discriminated from the Dao, and because all these things are discriminated from each other, there is de 德 (virtues). Where the discrimination is removed, there is the Dao, and adherence to the discrimination means deviation from the Dao. The diversity of things stirs up desires, and the control and utilization of things are a departure from the Dao. Only desires without self are compatible with nature. Desire discriminates with artificial measurements, and thus leads to knowledge. To acquire knowledge is to learn, and learning develops the capability to differentiate between the self and the other, so only a decline in learning can be conducive to human life. One can achieve something, transform external things and withstand nature only after he learns and acquires knowledge. On the other hand, wuwei 无为 (doing nothing) leads to wuwo 无我 (self-denial), avoiding the invention or differentiation of things. So, life is just the movement of the Dao, in which all things are allowed to take their own courses and nothing is left unaccomplished.

In: Frontiers of Philosophy in China
Editor: Livia Kohn
Thirty major scholars in the field wrote this new, authoritative guide to the main features and development of Daoism. The chapters are devoted to either specific periods, or topics such as Women in Daoism, Daoism in Korea and Daoist Ritual Music. Each chapter rigidly deals with a fixed set of aspects, such as history, texts, worldview and practices.
Clear markings in the chapters themselves and a detailed index make this volume the most accessible key resource on Daoism past and present.

, encompassed by dao . The most primitive meaning of dao is a way, road, or path. This meaning is apparent in the Shijing 诗经 (“Book of Songs”): “The way to Zhou was like a whetstone, and straight as an arrow. The officers trod it, and the common people looked on it,” 2 and “Long and tedious will be our

In: Philosophical Horizons
Editor: Livia Kohn
Thirty major scholars in the field wrote this new, authoritative guide to the main features and development of Daoism. The chapters are devoted to either specific periods, or topics such as Women in Daoism, Daoism in Korea and Daoist Ritual Music. Each chapter rigidly deals with a fixed set of aspects, such as history, texts, worldview and practices.
Clear markings in the chapters themselves and a detailed index make this volume the most accessible key resource on Daoism past and present.

all confronted themselves with, following a similar pursuit,. … the potentiality of a non-existent god. 20 Therefore, wherein lies happiness? Does it even exist in Bergman’s world? Dao and Other Matters Don’t listen with your ears, listen with your mind. No, don’t listen with your mind, but listen

In: Perspectives on Happiness

Daoism can be said to be China's own authentic religion. In spite of its long history and great influence on all aspects of China's culture and society, Daoism remains relatively little known and even less understood. The name Daoism comes from dao (written tao in the Wade-Giles transliteration), a

In: Brill's Encyclopedia of China Online
Author: Reiter, F.C.

Grundbegriff. Das »Dao De Jing« (»Buch vom D. und seiner Wirkkraft«) erläutert ihn als Inbegriff für Urgrund und Sein aller Wesenheiten und ihrer natürlichen Übereinstimmung. Sein Autor Lao Zi wird im rel. Daoismus seit dem 2.Jh. n.Chr. als Verkörperung des D. unter den Namen Lord Lao (Taishang Laojun) und

Author: PENG Peng

Xin 心 (Mind)” is one of the key concepts in the four chapters of Guanzi. Together with Dao, qi 气 (air, or gas) and de 德 (virtue), the four concepts constitute a complete system of the learning of mind which is composed of the theory of benti 本体 (root and body), the theory of practice and the theory of spiritual state. Guanzi differentiates the two basic layers of mind—the essence and the function. It tries to attain a state of accumulated jing 精 (essence, anima) and nourished qi, in which qi is concentrated in a miraculous way, through a series of methods of mind cultivation and nurturing, including being upright, calm, tranquil and moderate, and to concentrate the mind and intention. The doctrine of mind of the four chapters of Guanzi influenced Daoism and Confucianism and is a key link in the history of Chinese thought. It is a prelude to the merger of Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism.

In: Frontiers of Philosophy in China