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footsteps of several ancient church fathers, Wilhelm M. L. de Wette connected one of these—the book of Deuteronomy—with the biblical account of the discovery of a book in the Jerusalem temple during the reign of Judah’s King Josiah (621 bce ). 1 He based that conclusion on its doctrine of cult

In: Vetus Testamentum

epistemological revolution lies in the way it fuses genres so that they may join their respective forces. Drawing on a recent study by Meir Sternberg, the present study will bring forth a specific aspect of the cross-relationship between law and narrative in Deuteronomy: the book’s continuum turns out to be built

In: Vetus Testamentum

References to the place that God “will choose” ( yibḥar ) appear twenty-one times in the Masoretic Text ( mt ) of Deuteronomy. 1 The Samaritan Pentateuch ( sp ) features the perfect verbal form in each of these verses, so that rather than the place God “will choose” it is the place God “has

In: Vetus Testamentum
Author: Bill T. Arnold

love the suzerain, which clearly denotes in those texts exclusive loyalty. This is especially pertinent for the parenetic portions of Deuteronomy, in which such love for God is repeatedly commanded as an integral part of the book’s message. Recently, however, this understanding of love for God has been

In: Vetus Testamentum
Author: Jaclyn Neel

Deuteronomy 11:10 describes Egypt in rich language that has given rise to varied comment, particularly in the area of theology: אֲשֶׁר תִּזְרַע אֶת-זַרְעֲךָ וְהִשְׁקִיתָ בְרַגְלְךָ כְּגַן הַיָּרָק. 2 In this note, I will analyze its relevance to the field of ancient history, and in particular to

In: Vetus Testamentum
Author: Arie Versluis
According to Deuteronomy 7, God commands Israel to exterminate the indigenous population of Canaan. In The Command to Exterminate the Canaanites: Deuteronomy 7, Arie Versluis offers an analysis and evaluation of this command. Following an exegesis of the chapter, the historical background, possible motives and the place of the nations of Canaan in the Hebrew Bible are investigated.
The theme of religiously inspired violence continues to be a topic of interest. The present volume discusses the consequences of the command to exterminate the Canaanites for the Old Testament view of God and for the question whether the Bible legitimizes violence in the present. Finally, the author shows how he reads this text as a Christian theologian.
Author: Moshe Bar-Asher

there was no need for them in the other books; and words and phrases occurring only in a specific biblical book as special expressions related to a characteristic theme of the book. This is also evident in Deuteronomy, and I will deal here with one expression from that book. The two phrases שְׁגַר

In: Vetus Testamentum
Author: Bill T. Arnold

Recently in the pages of Vetus Testamentum , Frederick E. Greenspahn raised doubts once again about whether the book of Deuteronomy, and in particular chapter 12, requires cult centralization. 1 His conclusion, as stated in the abstract is quite clear. [T]he syntax of Deuteronomy 12

In: Vetus Testamentum
In Honour of C.J. Labuschagne on the Occasion of his 65th Birthday
Studies in Deuteronomy was compiled as a respectful tribute to Professor C.J. Labuschagne and was presented to him on the occasion of his 65th birthday. The choice of the book of Deuteronomy as a fitting topic for a collection of commemorative essays reflects the focus of Professor Labuschagne's own research on this part of the Bible in recent years.
The essays, which employ a variety of methodological approaches to the study of Deuteronomy, deal with such subjects as Masoretic, Septuagintal and Qumran variations in the text of Deuteronomy, Deuteronomic elements in other biblical books, and the reception history of Deuteronomy in the Jewish and Christian worlds. Included also is a first edition of some Deuteronomy manuscripts from Qumran, Masada and Nahal Hever.
Author: Daniel A. Frese

Introduction A noticeable feature in the Book of Deuteronomy—or, to be more precise, the D source which underlies it—is the repetitive use of stock terms and phrases. 1 Most of these are well-known and are tied to the ideological concerns of D; e.g., “love Yahweh your God with all your heart

In: Vetus Testamentum