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Skepticism toward disciplinarity, William F. Pinar points out, is etched deeply in the U. S. field, drawn by progressive education’s efforts to reconfigure the school curriculum as child-centered and/or as focused on social reconstruction. Skepticism toward disciplinarity had also been affirmed by Bobbitt and Charters’ positioning of adult activity as the organizer of the school curriculum. Add to these historical dispositions the contemporary legitimation crisis of the academic disciplines and the rage for interdisciplinary, trans-disciplinary, post-disciplinary—anything but disciplinary—research and curriculum becomes intelligible.
The intellectual labor of understanding constitutes the discipline of disciplinarity. Through the discipline of disciplinarity one contributes to the field’s intellectual advancement and to one’s own. Appreciating the centrality of disciplinarity to intellectual advancement requires us, Pinar argues, to replace Schwab’s syntactical and substantive structures of the disciplines. Focused on methodology and the concepts research methodology generates, Schwab’s schema was more appropriate to the natural and social-behavioral sciences than it is to the humanities and the arts. Pinar replaces these with two structures more appropriate to a discipline associated with the humanities and the arts and focused on the education of the public: horizontality and verticality.
Explicating Spivak’s notion of “planetarity” to specify the structures of subjectivity these structures of disciplinarity invite, Pinar illustrates these concepts through introductions to the scholarship of Ted Aoki, Tom Barone, Mary Aswell Doll, Maxine Greene, James Henderson, Dwayne Huebner, Rita Irwin, David Jardine, Kathleen Kesson, James B. Macdonald, Janet Miller, Marla Morris, Alice Pitt, William Reynolds, John Weaver, among others.
Of significance to all specializations in the broad and fragmented academic field of education, Intellectual Advancement through Disciplinarity provides the intellectual tools by means of which education scholars worldwide can participate in the complicated conversation that is internationalization in order to contribute to the intellectual sophistication of their nationally distinctive fields.
Critical Studies seeks to foster cross-disciplinarity and thus to participate in the ongoing reconfiguration of the Humanities and Social Sciences, while challenging received conceptual frames and perspectives, be they entrenched or 'current'.
To this aim, it publishes guest-edited, multi-authored collections of essays by scholars and intellectuals coming from various disciplinary and cultural backgrounds.
The series welcomes volumes dealing with a vast range of topics, from the most enduring to the most contemporary, such as future and emerging technologies.
Whether topics initially pertain to the fields of gender studies, media studies, postcolonial studies or studies in post-humanism, to name just a few, special consideration is given to collections that:
1. seriously attempt to produce innovative cross-disciplinary analyses by involving multiple theoretical languages and/or cultural areas;
2. do not content themselves with applying methodologies or theories but submit their own gestures and presuppositions to critical scrutiny;
3. endeavor to open new questions and to posit new objects for investigation on the basis of their methodological and theoretical innovation.

Critical Studies seeks to foster cross-disciplinarity and thus to participate in the ongoing reconfiguration of the Humanities and Social Sciences, while challenging received conceptual frames and perspectives, be they entrenched or 'current'.
To this aim, it publishes guest-edited, multi-authored collections of essays by scholars and intellectuals coming from various disciplinary and cultural backgrounds.
The series welcomes volumes dealing with a vast range of topics, from the most enduring to the most contemporary, such as future and emerging technologies.
Whether topics initially pertain to the fields of gender studies, media studies, postcolonial studies or studies in post-humanism, to name just a few, special consideration is given to collections that:
1. seriously attempt to produce innovative cross-disciplinary analyses by involving multiple theoretical languages and/or cultural areas;
2. do not content themselves with applying methodologies or theories but submit their own gestures and presuppositions to critical scrutiny;
3. endeavor to open new questions and to posit new objects for investigation on the basis of their methodological and theoretical innovation.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.
Transdisciplinary Studies is an internationally oriented book series created to generate new theories and practices to extricate transdisciplinary learning and research from the confining discourses of traditional disciplinarities. Within transdisciplinary domains, this series publishes empirically grounded, theoretically sound work that seeks to identify and solve global problems that conventional disciplinary perspectives cannot capture. Transdisciplinary Studies seeks to accentuate those aspects of scholarly research which cut across today's learned disciplines in an effort to define the new axiologies and forms of praxis that are transforming contemporary learning. This series intends to promote a new appreciation for transdisciplinary research to audiences that are seeking ways of understanding complex, global problems that many now realize disciplinary perspectives cannot fully address. Teachers, scholars, policy makers, educators and researchers working to address issues in technology studies, education, public finance, discourse studies, professional ethics, political analysis, learning, ecological systems, modern medicine, and other fields clearly are ready to begin investing in transdisciplinary models of research. It is for those many different audiences in these diverse fields that we hope to reach, not merely with topical research, but also through considering new epistemic and ontological foundations for of transdisciplinary research. We hope this series will exemplify the global transformations of education and learning across the disciplines for years to come.
Author: Sheldon Pollock

itself is only the first of several qualifications that make philology a leading candidate for the disciplinarity prize in any twenty-first century university that takes globalism seriously as a form of knowledge and not just as a marketing tool. First, philology is truly a universal ( not

In: Philological Encounters
Author: Barbara Bompani

disciplinarity. With the emergence of a kaleidoscope of paradigms, fields and subfields, methods and theories in the 18th century in Western Europe, unity of knowledge has been fragmented, ordered, and subsequently lost. The growth of science and scientific institutions has led to the fragmentation of academic

In: Religion and Theology
Brill's Educational Research E-Books Online, Collection 2005-2017 is the electronic version of the book publishing program of Brill in the field of Educational Research in 2005-2017.
Coverage: General, Education Policy & Politics, Culture and Education, Gender and Education, Youth, Social Justice, Adult Education, Children Education, Teacher Education, Higher Education, Comparative Education, Mathematics Education, Science Education, Art Education, Language Education, Inclusive Education, Educational Theory, Educational Philosophy, Educational Leadership, Educational Technology, Learning, Professional Development, Research Methodology.
This E-Book Collection is part of Brill's Educational Research E-Books Online.
The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.

For other pricing options, consortium arrangements and free 30-day trials contact us at sales-us@brill.com (the Americas) or sales-nl@brill.com (Europe, Middle East, Africa & Asia-Pacific).
Author: Rebecca Gould

This essay investigates the challenges facing Caucasus philology, by which I mean the institutional capacity to conduct deep research into the literary cultures of Azerbaijan Republic, Georgia, Daghestan, and Chechnya. I argue that the philological approach to the literary cultures of the Caucasus has been a casualty of the rise of areas studies in the North American academy during the Cold War, and that Cold War legacies continue to shape Caucasus Studies to this day. I conclude by offering three proposals for opening exchanges between the humanities and the social sciences within Caucasus Studies. More broadly, this essay argues for a rapprochement between the social sciences and philological inquiry vis-à-vis the Caucasus.

In: Iran and the Caucasus
Author: Amos Yong

[ JPT 14.1 (2005) 61-80] DOI: 10.1177/0966736905056544 © 2005 SAGE Publications (London, Thousand Oaks, CA and New Delhi) A CADEMIC G LOSSOLALIA ? P ENTECOSTAL S CHOLARSHIP , M ULTI - DISCIPLINARITY , AND THE S CIENCE –R ELIGION C ONVERSATION A MOS Y ONG * Regent University School of Divinity

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology
Author: Paul Burkett
This book undertakes the first general assessment of ecological economics from a Marxist point of view, and shows how Marxist political economy can make a substantial contribution to ecological economics. The analysis is developed in terms of four basic issues: (1) nature and economic value; (2) the treatment of nature as capital; (3) the significance of the entropy law for economic systems; (4) the concept of sustainable development. In each case, it is shown that Marxism can help ecological economics fulfill its commitments to multi-disciplinarity, methodological pluralism, and historical openness. In this way, a foundation is constructed for a substantive dialogue between Marxists and ecological economists.