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Shattering the Concept of EU Citizenship? The Potential Impact of Brexit and Potential Secession of Catalonia on EU Citizenship Christoph Schewe* Abstract In 2020, Brexit dominated the political agenda of the EU for its considerable conse- quences. One important aspect, however, has surprisingly

In: Baltic Yearbook of International Law Online

freedom of movement for persons. 1 The introduction of EU citizenship with the Treaty of Maastricht extended the scope of application of family reunification rights to Member State nationals that are not involved in economic activities. However, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU

In: European Journal of Migration and Law

child. Did Ruiz Zambrano mark a real change for the concept of EU citizenship in light of the constitutionalisation of the European Union? 5 This contribution will discuss the contribution of the Ruiz Zambrano judgment to the development of EU citizenship. In the analysis both EU and Dutch case

Open Access
In: European Journal of Migration and Law
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© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI: 10.1163/157181610X520391 European Journal of Migration and Law 12 (2010) 319–336 brill.nl/emil EU Citizenship: Revisiting its Meaning, Place and Potential Henri de Waele* Lecturer in European Law, Faculty of Law, Radboud University Nijmegen, The

In: European Journal of Migration and Law

the Substance of EU Citizenship Rights Ruiz Zambrano builds on the case of Rottmann , in which the CJEU decided that a decision to withdraw an individual of his or her Member State nationality falls ‘by reason of its nature and its consequences, within the ambit of European Union law’, if such a

Open Access
In: European Journal of Migration and Law
This collective volume examines how EU citizenship reconstructs in unexpected ways what citizenship as a status means and stands for. EU citizenship can neither be accurately described as a citizenship status similar to national citizenship, nor as an immigration one. The book examines the tension at the heart of attempts to grasp the nature of EU citizenship as supranational status in relation to family reunification, social rights and expulsion. It shows that while events such as Brexit stress the importance of EU citizenship, the construction of supranational citizenship along the axis of non-discrimination and equality remains a work in progress that requires the efforts of all actors involved - institutions, implementing authorities, courts and citizens.
In EU Citizenship, Nationality and Migrant Status: An Ongoing Challenge, Kristīne Krūma offers an account of the regulation of nationality at international, EU and national (Latvian) levels. Growing global migration and multiple individual loyalties lead to a fusion of national identities traditionally preserved by the EU Member States.
Dismantling national borders and granting directly effective rights to EU citizens broadens our understanding about belonging only to the limited territory of a single State. The primary focus is the status of the EU citizenship, which has become a meaningful status capable of satisfying claims by citizens. The Latvian example shows that migrant status cannot be ignored because of the crucial role of migrants in the future construct of the EU.

question whether the uk , as a state, can continue to enjoy eu benefits, but rather whether uk nationals, as individuals with human rights pertaining to their citizenship, can continue to enjoy their eu citizenship. The Treaty on the Functioning of European Union (‘ tfeu ’) creates a

Open Access
In: International Organizations Law Review

Free to Move but Nowhere to Go: The Renovation of Freedom of Movement as a Human Right for the Roma Alessandra Beasley Von Burg Abstract This chapter proposes a renovation of European Union (EU) citizenship as a more inclusive model that equates the Roma population and other marginalized or non

In: Boundaries: Dichotomies of Keeping in and Keeping Out
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This book examines the result of the 23 June 2016 UK referendum on leaving the EU where 51.9% of the eligible voters who voted chose to leave. Politicians and media have stressed not only that leave means leave, but also that much of the British voting public was motivated to vote leave by issues of immigration and border control. Guild investigates how the issue of EU citizenship became transformed into a discussion about immigration through four themes: the negotiations between the UK and the EU before the referendum; the nature of and difference between British and EU citizenship; the issue of third country national family members and the fears incited by the referendum in light of the rejection of expertise.