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A Resource for Students
Reading the Epistle to the Hebrews: A Resource for Students addresses major issues in the interpretation of this important but complex biblical text and provides an introduction to contemporary scholarship on Hebrews. With contributions from leading scholars on Hebrews and in related fields, this volume reflects the most recent trends in the study of Hebrews and is designed for classroom use by students in both undergraduate and graduate programs. The various chapters emphasize the importance of interpreting Hebrews in light of its ancient Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman contexts and address major interpretive issues, including genre, conceptual backgrounds, Hebrews’ use of Scripture and biblical themes, the theology of the letter and major theological issues in its reception, emerging interpretive approaches, and the use of the book in the history of Christian thought and worship. The contributors are Harold W. Attridge; Gabriella Gelardini; Patrick Gray; Rowan A. Greer; Craig R. Koester; Eric F. Mason; Frank J. Matera; Kevin B. McCruden; Alan C. Mitchell; David M. Moffitt; Jerome H. Neyrey, SJ; Kenneth Schenck; James W. Thompson; and Mark A. Torgerson.

revelation, atonement and the scope of faith 515 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2003 Biblical Interpretation 11, 3/4 Also available online – www.brill.nl REVELATION, ATONEMENT AND THE SCOPE OF FAITH IN THE EPISTLE TO THE HEBREWS: A DECONSTRUCTIVE AND READER-RESPONSE INTERPRETATION DAN O. VIA

In: Biblical Interpretation

SHORT NOTE COPTISMS IN THE EPISTLE TO THE HEBREWS? Reviewing HTRING'S commentary on Hebrews in "Recent Foreign Theology" (Exp. Times LXVII, 190), Professor H. H. ROWLEY notes without comment the author's suggestion that certain semitisms in the Epistle may in fact be coptisms, especially if the

In: Novum Testamentum

ON THE LITERARY GENRE OF THE "EPISTLE" TO THE HEBREWS BY JAMES SWETNAM Rome The Epistle to the Hebrews has been and is the object of so much divergent theorizing in the history of modern exegesis that one is tempted to doubt whether any substantial agreement about it is possible, at least in

In: Novum Testamentum
Scholars often explain Hebrews’ relative silence regarding Jesus’ resurrection by emphasizing the author’s appeal to Yom Kippur’s two key moments—the sacrificial slaughter and the high priest’s presentation of blood in the holy of holies—in his distinctive portrayal of Jesus’ death and heavenly exaltation. The writer’s depiction of Jesus as the high priest whose blood effected ultimate atonement appears to be modeled upon these two moments. Such a typology discourages discrete reflection on Jesus’ resurrection. Drawing on contemporary studies of Jewish sacrifice (which note that blood represents life, not death), parallels in Jewish apocalyptic literature, and fresh exegetical insights, this volume demonstrates that Jesus’ embodied, resurrected life is crucial for the high-priestly Christology and sacrificial soteriology developed in Hebrews.
Scholars often explain Hebrews’ relative silence regarding Jesus’ resurrection by emphasizing the author’s appeal to Yom Kippur’s two key moments—the sacrificial slaughter and the high priest’s presentation of blood in the holy of holies—in his distinctive portrayal of Jesus’ death and heavenly exaltation. The writer’s depiction of Jesus as the high priest whose blood effected ultimate atonement appears to be modeled upon these two moments. Such a typology discourages discrete reflection on Jesus’ resurrection. Drawing on contemporary studies of Jewish sacrifice (which note that blood represents life, not death), parallels in Jewish apocalyptic literature, and fresh exegetical insights, this volume demonstrates that Jesus’ embodied, resurrected life is crucial for the high-priestly Christology and sacrificial soteriology developed in Hebrews.

The Epistle to the Hebrews, a “word of encouragement” (13:22) addressed to followers of Christ apparently challenged by external threats and in danger of losing their enthusiasm for the faith, 1 uses a series of images to describe the salvation in which its addressees should hope, and charts a

In: Sōtēria: Salvation in Early Christianity and Antiquity

MELCHIZEDEK FROM GENESIS TO THE QUMRAN TEXTS AND THE EPISTLE TO THE HEBREWS BY M. DELCOR Toulouse The character Melchizedek appears in Genesis in a very episodic fashion. He crosses the sky like a meteor, nobody knowing where he comes from or where he is going to. We know only that he was king

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

The author of the Epistle to the Hebrews is steeped in the Jewish biblical tradition, and he makes much use of stories and characters from the Pentateuch in his “letter of exhortation” (Heb 13:22). Jesus is declared superior to Moses in one of the book’s several prominent comparisons (3

In: Golden Calf Traditions in Early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam