The European Yearbook promotes the scientific study of nineteen European supranational organisations and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Each volume contains a detailed survey of the history, structure and yearly activities of each organisation and an up-to-date chart providing a clear overview of the member states of each organisation. Each volume contains a comprehensive bibliography covering the year’s relevant publications.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
The Yearbook of the European Convention on Human Rights, edited by the Directorate General of Human Rights and Legal Affairs, is an indispensable record of the development and impact of the world’s oldest binding international human rights treaty.
It reviews the implementation of the Convention both by the European Court of Human Rights and by the Council of Europe’s Committee of Ministers, responsible for supervising the application of the Court’s judgments in the member states.

The Yearbook includes:
Full text of any new protocols to the Convention as they are opened for signature, together with the state of signatures and ratifications.
Full listing of Court judgments; judgments broken down by subject-matter; and extensive summaries of key judgments handed down by the Court during the year.
Selected human rights (DH) resolutions adopted as part of the Committee of Ministers’ work supervising the execution of the Court’s judgments.
Enquiries by the Secretary General carried out under Article 52 of the Convention.
Other work of the Council of Europe connected with the European Convention on Human Rights, carried out by the Committee of Ministers, the Parliamentary Assembly, and the Directorate General of Human Rights and Legal Affairs.
Bibliographic information from the library of the European Court of Human Rights.
The Yearbook is published in an English-French bilingual edition.
Texts Collected by the Council of Europe Venice Commission
Over the last two decades the political landscape of Europe has evolved significantly, with many central and east European countries taking major steps towards establishing more liberal and democratic societies, largely through constitutional change. This unique collection groups together the constitutions of 46 European countries, including all the Council of Europe member states, as well as Belarus, and Serbia and Montenegro, and traces the historical background of each. Presented on a country-by-country basis and highly accessible each section provides maps and key factual data on the country concerned.

This unique reference work will be of particular interest to constitutional law specialists, policy makers, researchers, libraries and all those interested in comparative law and in learning more about the process of constitutional drafting.