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Neftali Sillero, João Campos, Anna Bonardi, Claudia Corti, Raymond Creemers, Pierre-Andre Crochet, Jelka Crnobrnja Isailović, Mathieu Denoël, Gentile Francesco Ficetola, João Gonçalves, Sergei Kuzmin, Petros Lymberakis, Philip de Pous, Ariel Rodríguez, Roberto Sindaco, Jeroen Speybroeck, Bert Toxopeus, David R. Vieites and Miguel Vences

data claims for an update of the herpetofaunal distribution data also at the European level, to quantify Europe-wide the improvement in knowledge since the previous Atlas, as well as a first step towards tracking potential changes in the distribution of the European herpetofauna in the context of

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various activities in 1990. Three meetings took place. The 18th full meeting was convened in France in May, being jointly the inaugural meeting of the IUCN Species Survival Group for European Herpetofauna. This meeting gave opportunities to assess the Tortoise Village at Gonfaron (our hosts) and to carry

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Roger Avery

Book Reviews Corbett, K., (ed.) (1989): Conservation of European Reptiles and Amphibians. 1-274, 15 coloured figs., 37 half-tones and diagrams. Price £11.95. Christopher Helm, London. This is the long-awaited handbook on the conservation status of European herpetofauna, commissioned by IUCN

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Roger Avery

down the European Herpetofauna. The advantage of this breakdown is that more space is available for the individual species. This book is a fine example. Not only are all species dealt with extensively, but also the general introduction is longer than would be expected for a field guide. The general

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Short report concerning the Taxonomic Committee of SEH The Taxonomic Committee of SEH deals with the taxonomic and nomenclatural status mainly of the European herpetofauna. Taxonomic issues are newly described species, resurrections of former synonyms, upgrading subspecific names to specific

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Marinus S. Hoogmoed

down the European Herpetofauna. The advantage of this breakdown is that more space is available for the individual species. This book is a fine example. Not only are all species dealt with extensively, but also the general introduction is longer than would be expected for a field guide. The general

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D. James Harris and Miguel Carretero

announcement of the pub- lisher, the long-awaited book of Rudolf Malkmus appeared to fill an important gap in the literature on the distribution of European herpetofauna. This attractive book, the first on the reptiles and amphibians of Portugal in English aims to portray “the current distribution range of the

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Ilya S. Darevsky and M.A. Bakradze

in the last catalogue of European herpetofauna by MERTENS and WERMUTH (1960: 177). New interest in the specimen described by WERNER arose only a few years ago as a re- sult of ScHn?nDTLEa's and SCHMIDTLER'S study on the snake genus Eirenis, including the description of a new species of the collaris

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Marinus S. Hoogmoed

(no translations are planned). All fieldguides dealing with the European herpetofauna sofar were written by "west" Europeans. This is the first such guide written by "east" Europeans and this shows immediately in the area and species treated. Most "western" fieldguides consider a line from the Sea of

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Marinus S. Hoogmoed

European herpetofauna sofar were written by "west" Europeans. This is the first such guide written by "east" Europeans and this shows immediately in the area and species treated. Most "western" fieldguides consider a line from the Sea of Azof to the White Sea the eastern border of Europe, the exception