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Series:

Edited by Robert Hampson and Max Saunders

Ford Madox Ford's Modernity explores the relation between modern writing and modern experience. It examines how his prose registers the impact on society and the arts of new technologies, such as railways and telephones. It demonstrates how Ford’s writing reflects, and elaborates, new conceptions of subjectivity, gender, nation and empire. And it establishes his contribution to the growing sense of crisis in the fields of history, epistemology, and representation. It includes essays by twenty leading Ford scholars on a wide range of his fiction and criticism, giving particular attention to The Good Soldier and to his responses to modern war.

Ford Madox Ford

A Reappraisal

Series:

Edited by Robert Hampson and Tony Davenport

The controversial British writer Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) is increasingly recognized as a major presence in early twentieth-century literature.
He is best-known for his fiction, especially the modernist masterpiece The Good Soldier, and the four books making up Parade’s End, described by Anthony Burgess as ‘the finest novel about the First World War’; and by Samuel Hynes as ‘the greatest war novel ever written by an Englishman’.
This series, International Ford Madox Ford Studies, has been founded to reflect the recent resurgence of interest in Ford’s life and work. Each volume will normally be based upon a particular theme or issue. Each will relate aspects of Ford’s work, life, and contacts, to broader concerns of his time. He published nearly eighty books, experimenting with a variety of genres. This first volume explores Ford’s diversity, focusing on the best of his less familiar work: his poetry, writings on art, and the novels A Call, The Simple Life Limited, The Marsden Case, and The Rash Act.

Ford Madox Ford

Literary Networks and Cultural Transformations

Series:

Edited by Andrzej Gasiorek and Daniel Moore

The controversial British writer Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) is increasingly recognized as a major presence in early twentieth-century literature. This series of International Ford Madox Ford Studies was founded to reflect the recent resurgence of interest in him. Each volume is based upon a particular theme or issue; and relates aspects of Ford’s work, life, and contacts, to broader concerns of his time. The present book is part of a large-scale reassessment of his roles in literary history.
Ford is best-known for his fiction, especially The Good Soldier, long considered a modernist masterpiece; and Parade’s End, which Anthony Burgess described as ‘the finest novel about the First World War’; and Samuel Hynes has called ‘the greatest war novel ever written by an Englishman’. In these, as in most of his books, Ford renders and analyses the crucial transformations in modern society and culture. One of the most striking features of his career is his close involvement with so many of the major international literary groupings of his time. In the South-East of England at the fin-de-siècle, he collaborated for a decade with Joseph Conrad, and befriended Henry James and H. G. Wells. In Edwardian London he founded the English Review, publishing these writers alongside his new discoveries, Ezra Pound, D. H. Lawrence, and Wyndham Lewis. After the war he moved to France, founding the transatlantic review in Paris, taking on Hemingway as a sub-editor, discovering another generation of Modernists such as Jean Rhys and Basil Bunting, and publishing them alongside Joyce and Gertrude Stein. Besides his role as contributor and enabler to various versions of Modernism, Ford was also one of its most entertaining chroniclers.
This volume includes twelve new essays on Ford’s engagement with the literary networks and cultural shifts of his era, by leading experts and younger scholars of Ford and Modernism. Two of the essays are by well-known creative writers: the novelist Colm Tóibín, and the novelist and cultural commentator Zinovy Zinik.

Series:

Edited by Laura Colombino and Max Saunders

The controversial British writer Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) is increasingly recognized as a major presence in early twentieth-century literature. This series of International Ford Madox Ford Studies was founded to reflect the recent resurgence of interest in him. Each volume is based upon a particular theme or issue; and relates aspects of Ford’s work, life, and contacts, to broader concerns of his time.
Ford is best-known for his fiction, especially The Good Soldier, long considered a modernist masterpiece; and Parade’s End, which Anthony Burgess described as ‘the finest novel about the First World War’, Samuel Hynes has called ‘the greatest war novel ever written by an Englishman’, and which has been adapted by Tom Stoppard for the acclaimed BBC/HBO television series.
This volume focuses on Ford’s work from the Edwardian decade and a half before the First World War. It contains Michael Schmidt’s Ford Madox Ford Lecture, and fourteen other essays by British, American, French and German experts, both leading authorities and younger scholars. Chapters on Ford’s fiction, poetry, criticism of literature and painting, writing about England, and dealings on the Edwardian literary scene as editor and with publishers, bring out his versatility and ingenuity throughout his first major creative phase.

Edited by Max Saunders

The controversial British writer Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) is increasingly recognized as a major presence in early twentieth-century literature.
He is best-known for his fiction, especially The Good Soldier, long considered a modernist masterpiece; and Parade’s End, which Anthony Burgess described as ‘the finest novel about the First World War’; and Samuel Hynes has called ‘the greatest war novel ever written by an Englishman’.
The book series, International Ford Madox Ford Studies, has been founded to reflect the recent resurgence of interest in Ford’s life and work. Each volume will normally be based upon a particular theme or issue. Each will relate aspects of Ford’s work, life, and contacts, to broader concerns of his time.

The series is published in association with the Ford Madox Ford Society.
For information about the Ford Madox Ford Society, please see the website at:
www.open.ac.uk/Arts/fordmadoxford-society

or contact:
max.saunders@kcl.ac.uk
or
Dr Sara Haslam s.j.haslam@open.ac.uk
Department of Literature, Open University,
Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK

Guidelines for contributors to IFMFS, including a full list of abbreviations of Ford's titles and related works, can be found on the website.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.

Series:

Edited by Dennis Brown and Jenny Plastow

The controversial British writer Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) is increasingly recognized as a major presence in early twentieth-century literature. International Ford Madox Ford Studies has been founded to reflect the recent resurgence of interest in him. Each volume is based upon a particular theme or issue; each will relate aspects of Ford’s work, life, and contacts, to broader concerns of his time. Ford is best-known for his fiction, especially The Good Soldier, long considered a modernist masterpiece; and Parade’s End, which Anthony Burgess described as ‘the finest novel about the First World War’; and Samuel Hynes has called ‘the greatest war novel ever written by an Englishman’. These works, together with his trilogy The Fifth Queen, about Henry VIII and Katharine Howard, are centrally concerned with the idea of Englishness. All these, and other works across Ford’s prolific oeuvre, are studied here. Critics of Edwardian and Modernist literature have been increasingly turning to Ford’s brilliant 1905 experiment in Impressionism, The Soul of London, as an exemplary text. His trilogy England and the English (of which this forms the first part) provides a central reference-point for this volume, which presents Ford as a key contributor to Edwardian debates about the ‘Condition of England’. His complex, ironic attitude to Englishness makes his approach stand out from contemporary anxieties about race and degeneration, and anticipate the recent reconsideration of Englishness in response to post-colonialism, multiculturalism, globalization, devolution, and the expansion and development of the European Community.
Ford’s apprehension of the major social transformations of his age lets us read him as a precursor to cultural studies. He considered mass culture and its relation to literary traditions decades before writers like George Orwell, the Leavises, or Raymond Williams. The present book initiates a substantial reassessment, to be continued in future volumes in the series, of Ford’s responses to these cultural transformations, his contacts with other writers, and his phases of activity as an editor working to transform modern literature. From another point of view, the essays here also develop the project established in earlier volumes, of reappraising Ford’s engagement with the city, history, and modernity.

Series:

Edited by Sara Haslam and Seamus O'Malley

The controversial British writer Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) is increasingly recognized as a major presence in early twentieth-century literature. This series of International Ford Madox Ford Studies was founded to reflect the recent resurgence of interest in him. Each volume is based upon a particular theme or issue; and relates aspects of Ford’s work, life, and contacts, to broader concerns of his time.
Ford is best-known for his fiction, especially The Good Soldier, long considered a modernist masterpiece; and Parade’s End, which Anthony Burgess described as ‘the finest novel about the First World War’, Samuel Hynes has called ‘the greatest war novel ever written by an Englishman’, and which has been adapted by Tom Stoppard for the BBC and HBO.
Ford’s America, like the other places he wrote about extensively such as England or France, is a place of the imagination as much as the real place in which he lived and travelled. This volume is the first extended treatment of Ford’s lifelong contacts with American literature and culture. It combines contributions from British and American experts on Ford and Modernism. It has five closely inter-connected sections which display, between them, the range of Ford’s creative relationships with American writers and American territory. The first explores the transatlantic dimension of Ford’s modernism, from his involvement with Americans like James and Pound in Britain before the war, through the Paris days among the Americans in the transatlantic review circle such as Hemingway and Stein, to his time in America in the 20s and 30s, and the American care for his reputation after his death. The second section focuses on New York, and the publishing world portrayed in Ford’s only novel set mainly in the US, When the Wicked Man. A third section, discussing culture, politics, and journalism in his writing of the 1930s, is followed by two examples of his commentary on contemporary American culture, both published here for the first time. The final section juxtaposes two examples of the many American writers who have paid tribute to Ford: an essay tracking Robert Lowell’s regular recollections of his encounters with him; and Mary Gordon’s celebration of his life with the Polish-American painter Janice Biala.
The volume also contains fourteen illustrations, including artwork by Biala and photographs of Ford.

Series:

Edited by Paul Skinner

The controversial British writer Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) is increasingly recognized as a major presence in early twentieth-century literature. This series of International Ford Madox Ford Studies was founded to reflect the recent resurgence of interest in him. Each volume is based upon a particular theme or issue; and relates aspects of Ford’s work, life, and contacts, to broader concerns of his time. The present book is part of a large-scale reassessment of his roles in literary history.
Ford is best-known for his fiction, especially The Good Soldier, long considered a modernist masterpiece; and Parade’s End, which Anthony Burgess described as ‘the finest novel about the First World War’; and Samuel Hynes has called ‘the greatest war novel ever written by an Englishman’. But he was a prolific writer in many different modes, which include criticism of others’ writing, and reminiscences of the many writers he had known. One of the most striking features of his career is his close involvement with so many of the major international literary groupings of his time. In the South-East of England at the fin-de-siècle, he collaborated for a decade with Joseph Conrad, and befriended Henry James, and H. G. Wells. In Edwardian London he founded the English Review, publishing these writers alongside his new discoveries, Ezra Pound, D. H. Lawrence, and Wyndham Lewis. After the war he moved to France, founding the transatlantic review in Paris, taking on Hemingway as a sub-editor, discovering another generation of Modernists such as Jean Rhys and Basil Bunting, and publishing them alongside Joyce and Gertrude Stein. He spent more time in America from the later 1920s, spending time with Southern Agrarians, and poets such as William Carlos Williams, Charles Olson, and Robert Lowell. He was always a tireless promoter of younger writers, reading manuscripts and recommending them to publishers.
This book takes Ford’s ‘literary contacts’ to include such creative friendships, editorial involvements, and influential biographical encounters; and they form the most substantial, central section on ‘Contemporaries and Confrères’, covering figures like Proust, Carlos Williams, Rebecca West, Herbert Read, and Hemingway. But it also explores contacts with literary texts. The first section on ‘Predecessors’ considers the impact of Ford’s reading of Trollope, George Eliot, and Turgenev. The final section discusses ‘Successors’: writers such as Graham Greene, Burgess, and A. S. Byatt, whose literary contacts with Ford have been as his admiring readers and eloquent critics. Ford has been described as ‘a writer’s writer’. This volume reveals how true that has been, and in how many ways, as it sheds new light on his relationships with other writers, both familiar and surprising. It includes two pieces published here for the first time: one by Ford himself, on Turgenev; the other a memoir about Ford by his contemporary, Marie Belloc Lowndes (the sister of Hilaire Belloc).

Series:

Edited by Sara Haslam

The controversial British writer Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) is increasingly recognized as a major presence in early twentieth-century literature. The book series, International Ford Madox Ford Studies, has been founded to reflect the recent resurgence of interest in Ford’s life and work. Each volume will normally be based upon a particular theme or issue. Each will relate aspects of Ford’s work, life, and contacts, to broader concerns of his time.
Ford is best-known for his fiction, especially The Good Soldier, long considered a modernist masterpiece; and Parade’s End, which Anthony Burgess described as ‘the finest novel about the First World War’; and Samuel Hynes has called ‘the greatest war novel ever written by an Englishman’. However, critics of Edwardian and Modernist literature have been increasingly turning to Ford’s brilliant 1905 experiment in Impressionism, The Soul of London, as an exemplary text.
Ford Madox Ford and the City assembles fourteen pioneering essays, by new as well as established European and American scholars, exploring Ford’s representations of real and ideal cities, across the full range of his work, from his earliest verse, to his post-war prose and poetry of the 1920s and 1930s.
The volume is divided into three sections. The first focuses on his changing views of London, with The Soul of London taking pride of place. The second concentrates on the other great cities Ford lived and worked in – Paris and New York – as well as considering the role of the virtual or fantasy city. Besides reflecting new developments in research on Ford, the collection represents a significant contribution to studies in Modernism, literature and the city, Englishness and nationality. It concludes with three masterly essays by Ford himself – two of them published here for the first time – on cities he visited during his travels through America in the 1930s: Boston, Denver and Nashville.

Series:

Edited by Joseph Wiesenfarth

History and Representation in Ford Madox Ford’s Writings explores the idea of history across various genres: fiction, autobiography, books about places and cultures, criticism, and poetry. ‘I wanted the Novelist in fact to appear in his really proud position as historian of his own time’, wrote Ford. The twenty leading specialists assembled for this volume consider his writing about twentieth-century events, especially the First World War; and also his representations of the past, particularly in his fine trilogy about Henry VIII and Katharine Howard, The Fifth Queen. Ford’s provocative dealings with the relationship between fiction and history is shown to anticipate postmodern thinking about historiography and narrative. The collection includes essays by two acclaimed novelists, Nicholas Delbanco and Alan Judd, assessing Ford’s grasp of literary history, and his place in it.