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Multisensory Research 26 Supplement (2013) 111 brill.com/msr Oral Presentation Proprioception can contribute to the localization of visual targets for goal-directed movements Marieke C. W. van der Graaff ∗ MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU University

In: Multisensory Research
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quite detached from the muscles and joints that are involved in the action. Keywords : Motor control; tools; goal-directed movements; reaction time; pointing. INTRODUCTION In order to reach out for an object with our hand, we must transform visual information about positions that are suitable for

In: Spatial Vision

Tactile information arriving at our sensory receptors is differentially processed over the various temporal phases of goal-directed movements. By using event-related potentials (ERPs), we investigated the neuronal correlates of tactile information processing during movement. Participants performed goal-directed reaches for an object placed centrally on the table in front of them. Tactile and visual stimuli were presented in separate trials during the different phases of the movement (i.e., preparation, execution, and post-movement). These stimuli were independently delivered to either the moving or the resting hand. In a control condition, the participants only performed the movement, while omission (movement-only) ERPs were recorded. Participants were told to ignore the presence or absence of any sensory events and solely concentrate on the execution of the movement. The results highlighted enhanced ERPs between 80 and 200 ms after tactile stimulation, and between 100 and 250 ms after visual stimulation. These modulations were greatest over the execution phase of the goal-directed movement, they were effector-based (i.e., significantly more negative for stimuli presented at the moving hand), and modality-independent (i.e., similar ERP enhancements were observed for both tactile and visual stimuli). The enhanced processing of sensory information over the execution phase of the movement suggests that incoming sensory information may be used for a potential adjustment of the current motor plan. Moreover, these results indicate a tight interaction between attentional mechanisms and the sensorimotor system.

In: Seeing and Perceiving

Multisensory Research 26 Supplement (2013) 111 brill.com/msr Oral Presentation Proprioception can contribute to the localization of visual targets for goal-directed movements Marieke C. W. van der Graaff ∗ MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU University

. INTRODUCTION Visual localization of the goal is the Ž rst stage in the process of performing accurate goal directed movements. Numerous studies in animal and man have shown that visually guided movements imply sensorimotor transformations which convert the retinal visual information in egocentric motor

In: Spatial Vision

of three- dimensional shape, Nature 349 , 411–413. Desmurget, M., Pelisson, D., Rossetti, Y. and Prablanc, C. (1998). From eye to hand: planning goal- directed movements, Neuroscience and Biobehavioural Reviews 22 , 761–788. Dijkerman, H. C., Milner, A. D. and Carey, D. P. (1996). The perception and

In: Spatial Vision

/sculpture are the visible traces of goal-directed movements, hence in principle capable of ac- tivating the somatotopically relevant motor areas in the observer’s brain, as suggested by the mirror neuron research.«17 Empirical evidence indirectly suggesting that this might be the case, consists of studies

In: Bilder animierter Bewegung/Images of Animate Movement

particular, sensory signals provide rich and reliable information for the motor system to plan and control goal-directed movements, such as those that we frequently perform with the hand. In their simplest description, these movements consist in transforming information related to the spatiotemporal goal of

In: Multisensory Research

suggests that intentional goal directed movements of the upper limbs can be reconstructed and transmitted to external manipulandum or robotic devices con- trolled from a relatively small number of microelectrodes implanted into movement-relevant brain areas after some training, opening the door for the

In: The European Image of God and Man

dynamic visual afferent information in goal-directed aiming movements, Exper. Brain Res. 138 , 419–431. Bédard, P. and Proteau, L. (2004). On-line vs. off-line utilization of peripheral visual afferent information to ensure spatial accuracy of goal-directed movements, Exper. Brain Res. 158 , 75– 85. Bock

In: Spatial Vision