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new stereo duet playback design and provide evidence that Australian magpie-larks, Grallina cyanoleuca , make significantly more flights towards duet playback presented in a more realistic stereo context. Male and female magpie-lark pairs did not split up and attack one ‘intruder’ each when presented

In: Behaviour

urbanisation on bird behaviour. The chosen species for this investigation were willie wagtails ( Rhipidura leucophrys ) and magpie larks ( Grallina cyanoleuca ). Both bird species belong to the passerine order and occupy the same territory year round, a factor that was important to the data collection

In: Behaviour

between the form and function of coordinated acoustic signals is poorly un- derstood. The coordination of signals by male and female birds to produce duets could be a cooperative display or a consequence of conflict between the sexes. Australian magpie- larks ( Grallina cyanoleuca ) produce antiphonal

In: Behaviour
Author: Judith Scarl

rather than single intruders (Hall, 2000; Molles & Waas, 2006). In some species, such as the Australian magpie-lark ( Grallina cyanoleuca ), pairs respond more strongly towards the initiator of a two-bird vocalization bout (Rogers et al., 2004), but these re- sults are not specific to one sex or the

In: Behaviour

-larks ( Grallina cyanoleuca , Hall, 2006) share song types between sexes, but birds of all three species respond differently to playbacks of male versus female song, indicating that song dimorphism is relevant to their communication systems (Yamaguchi, 1998; Mennill, 2006; Hall, 2000; Mulder et al., 2003). Less

In: Behaviour

-territorial floating pairs (Temeles, 1994). Duets are thought to function in joint defense of territories in several species including Parrot duet syntax 223 the canary-winged parakeet, Brotogeris versicolorus (Arrowood, 1988), the magpie-lark, Grallina cyanoleuca (Hall, 2000; Mulder et al., 2003), and the gibbon

In: Behaviour

). Alternate functions for duet and solo songs in magpie-larks, Grallina cyanoleuca . — Aust. J. Zool. 51: 25-30. Naguib, M. (2005). Singing interactions in song birds: implications for social relations and territoriality. — In: Communication networks (McGregor, P.K., ed.). Cambridge Uni- versity Press

In: Behaviour
Author: Lauryn Benedict

larks ( Grallina cyanoleuca ), duets appear to function mainly as a resource defense signal (Hall, 2000; Logue & Gammon, 2004). In some systems duets function both in acoustic mate guarding and in resource defense (Grafe & Bitz, 2004; Marshall-Ball et al., 2006). Duets may function as intra

In: Behaviour
Author: Nathalie Seddon

, con ict or commitment? — Anim. Behav. 60, p. 667-677. — — & McGrath, R.D. (2000). Duetting and mate-guarding in Australian magpie-larks ( Grallina cyanoleuca ). — Behav. Ecol. Sociobiol. 47, p. 180-187. Horn, A.G. & Falls, J.B. (1996). Categorization and the design of signals: the case of song

In: Behaviour

). Precise duet coordination without overlapping phrases is achieved by answering a partner’s phrase neither too soon nor too late, and is a promi- nent feature of Cantorchilus songs, but not of those of Pheugopedius and Thryophilus . Recent studies of the magpie lark, Grallina cyanoleuca (Hall & Magrath

In: Behaviour