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Author: Neil Craik

* University of Waterloo, <ncraik@uwaterloo.ca>. The author acknowledges the support of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (Grant 430-2012-0514). 1 Introduction As geoengineering research moves from modeling and laboratory studies to field experiments, there is a

In: Climate Law

governance of high-risk technologies. While there is no agreement on how bad climate change impacts would have to be for srm to be deployed, some scientists have proposed research and development of geoengineering techniques that will either reduce incoming heat or reduce atmospheric heat retention in the

In: Climate Law
Author: Karen N. Scott

1 Introduction 1 Marine geoengineering demonstrates the gaps, promise and limitations of the modern law of the sea. As geoengineering is an activity that lay beyond the imaginations of the original negotiators of the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea ( unclos ), 2 there are

In: High Seas Governance

futures themselves. 1 ∵ 1 Overview On 10 February 2015, the ad hoc Committee on Geoengineering Climate of the us National Academy of Sciences’ ( nas ) National Research Council released a two-volume report on climate geoengineering. 2 It presents a suite of potential technological options

In: Climate Law

’s special issue on geoengineering law, guest-edited by Wil Burns and Simon Nicholson. The bulk of the special issue will be published as Volume 5(2–3), 2015. 1 Introduction Since the industrial revolution, the widespread burning of fossil fuels by humans has caused greenhouse gases to build up in the

In: Climate Law

Introduction * Large-scale geoengineering projects have been proposed recently for the purpose of preventing or mitigating global climate change, and a few have been implemented in the midst of public outcry (e.g., a recent project in the subarctic Pacific Ocean off Canada in 2012). Therefore, a

In: Global Commons and the Law of the Sea

, geoengineering has been proposed as an additional mitigation tool by some. Geoengineering comes in two types. Carbon dioxide removal ( cdr ) would sequester CO 2 . It would be relatively low-risk and high-cost; its cooling impact would not be felt for a long time. Solar radiation management ( srm ) would reflect

In: Climate Law
In: Climate Law
Editor: Keyuan Zou
'Global Commons’ refers to resource domains or areas that lie outside of the political reach of any one State, including sea areas beyond national jurisdiction and Antarctica. The concept of ‘global commons’ is a living concept and can accommodate, over time, other commons at the international level, such as biodiversity and generic resources. The outlook for the global marine commons is not encouraging: fishery resources continue to deplete, marine biodiversity continues to reduce, and plastic wastes in the oceans continue to increase. In international law, there are legal regimes governing global marine commons, the most important of which is the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOSC). Effective as of 1994 LOSC governs the high seas, international seabed and its resources, marine environmental protection, and fisheries.

Global Commons and the Law of the Sea offers intellectual discussions on global marine commons. It contains six parts respectively addressing the principle of the common heritage of mankind (CHM), freedoms of high seas, deep sea mining and international seabed, area beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ) governance, management of geoengineering and generic resources, and recent developments in the polar regions.
In: Global Commons and the Law of the Sea