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1 The Transliteration of Greek Names in Arabic 346 – 2 The Lexicography of Greek-Arabic Translations 347 – 3 The Translator’s World View 349 – 4 The Bilingualism of the Translator and the Role of Syriac-Aramaic Intermediate Translations 350 – 5 The Translator’s Lexical Tools 350 – 6 The

In: From the Greeks to the Arabs and Beyond
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© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI: 10.1163/187783710X536707 Oriens 38 (2010) 165-184 brill.nl/orie Cultural Accommodation and the Idea of Translation Uwe Vagelpohl University of Warwick Abstract The translations produced in the course of the Greek-Arabic translation movement of the ninth

In: Oriens

these Christian translators is deemed to be the creator of the school of Neoplatonic-Aristotelianism and Greek logical thought that represented ‘ Falsafa ’ in the 8th–10th centuries. 2 What has not been yet sufficiently studied is the relationship between the Greek-Arabic translation movement and the

In: Journal of Eastern Christian Studies
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ninth cen- turies and sketches its appropriation, revision and, ultimately, transformation by Islamic philosophers between the ninth and eleventh centuries. Keywords Greek-Arabic translation, Syriac translation, Islamic philosophy, ninth century, Bagh- dad peripatetics, reception history Of the

In: Vivarium
The Syriac and Arabic translation and commentary tradition
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The two centuries following the rise of the Abbasid caliphate in 750 witnessed a wave of translations from Greek into Syriac and Arabic. The translation and reception of Aristotle's Rhetoric is a prime example for the resulting transformation of antique learning in the Islamic world and beyond. On the basis of a close textual analysis of the Rhetoric, this study develops elements of a comparative “translation grammar” of Greek-Arabic translations. Contextualizing the analysis with an account of the textual history and the Syriac and Arabic philosophical tradition drawing on theRhetoric, it throws new light on the inner workings of the “translation movement” and its impact on Islamic culture.
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The term ‘Greek/Arabic translation movement’ describes a wave of translations of Greek scientific and philosophical texts either directly into Arabic or by way of Syriac. Unsystematic translation activities probably date back to the early years of the Umayyad era (40/661–133/749 C.E.); information

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” ! Problems of translation history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ! The history of Greek-Arabic translations . . . . . . . . . . . !" Translation history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . !# Chapter Two: The Arabic version #$ Manuscript and dating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . #$ The

In: Aristotle's Rhetoric in the East
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inexperienced translator who had problems not only with the language of the Rhetoric but also with the cultural background re- quired to understand it. Conceptual issues loomed large in our historical survey of the Greek- Arabic translation movement, e.g. the subtle and not so subtle influence of preconceived

In: Aristotle's Rhetoric in the East
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CHAPTER ONE “GREEK INTO ARABIC” P    The study of the Greek-Arabic translation movement is a scholarly field at the crossroads of a number of related subjects. On the one hand, it belongs to the domain of history, it is part and parcel of the political and intellectual

In: Aristotle's Rhetoric in the East

, either by himself or by one of his collaborators. There are also some more general results. Hitherto, the study of Greek-Arabic translation technique was mostly concerned either with lexicographical or morphological questions, or highlighted individual syntactical features. How an individual Greek term

In: The Oriental Tradition of Paul of Aegina's Pragmateia