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Attention has recently been drawn to a difficult place in the text of one of the letters written by Gregory of Nazianzus to Basil ( Ep. 4). Having decided to live a life of asceticism, Basil took up residence on a charming property near Annesi in Pontus, where he had grown up as a child. As

Open Access
In: Vigiliae Christianae

Symposium , and the paraenetic Iambi ad Seleucum of Amphilochius of Iconium, the cousin of Gregory of Nazianzus, may serve as examples. 5 Gregory of Nazianzus himself was the most productive author of early Christian poetry. 6 Born around AD 329 in Arianzus close to Nazianzus in Cappadocia, Gregory

In: Early Christianity in Asia Minor and Cyprus

Symposium , and the paraenetic Iambi ad Seleucum of Amphilochius of Iconium, the cousin of Gregory of Nazianzus, may serve as examples. 5 Gregory of Nazianzus himself was the most productive author of early Christian poetry. 6 Born around AD 329 in Arianzus close to Nazianzus in Cappadocia, Gregory

In: Early Christianity in Asia Minor and Cyprus
Author:

The Hymn to God ascribed to Gregory of Nazianzus has troubled more than one scholarly reader of the Church Fathers: the hymn does not mention Jesus Christ, and it glorifies instead the inaccessibility of God, his unknowable and unspeakable nature in a vocabulary whose Neoplatonic mark has not

In: The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition
Author:

. 1) I will thus try to illuminate the differences and especially similarities between the use of this motif in both inscriptional and literary epigrams. I will deal, in particular, with the epigrams of Gregory of Nazianzus against tomb desecrators. 1. Inscriptional Epigrams The earliest case

In: Mnemosyne

Gregory of Nazianzus (330–c. 390 CE) is also known as Gregory the Theologian, an epithet granted him at the Council of Chalcedon in 451 CE recognizing his definitive articulation of Trinitarian doctrine. He was a principal proponent of the retention of the classical tradition in a developing

Gregory of Nazianzus (330–c. 390 CE) is also known as Gregory the Theologian, an epithet granted him at the Council of Chalcedon in 451 CE recognizing his definitive articulation of Trinitarian doctrine. He was a principal proponent of the retention of the classical tradition in

in Brill Encyclopedia of Early Christianity Online

.) Letters: P. Gallay, GCS 53, 1983; idem , CUFr 1964 (Fr.); idem , BGrL 13, 1981 (Ger.) On Gregory of Nazianzus: J. Bernardi, Saint Grégoire de Nazianze , 1995 F. Trisoglio, Gregorio di Nazianzo il teologo , 1996 C. Moreschini, Filosofia e letteratura

in Religion Past and Present Online

Saint Gregory of Nazianzus ( c . 329- c . 390), one of the ‘Cappadocian Fathers’, was accorded the title ‘the Theologian’ by the eastern church for his classic exposition of the doctrine of the Trinity. He was also an outstanding preacher. Born into a Christian family in Cappadocia, he received a

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In: Scrinium