This grammar introduces undergraduate and graduate students to the essentials of classical Hebrew. It begins with the simple and regular elements of the language and proceeds to the complex and irregular, frequently referencing the historical development of Hebrew. Extensive explanations of elements in English prepare students for the discussion of the corresponding Hebrew element. Through the course of the text, the reader will translate the book of Ruth as well as other biblical and nonbiblical texts, learning particular skills in reading both the entire Hebrew Bible and the later sixth-century Hebrew material, such as the Lachish Letter. Accomplished students of this text will be prepared to progress to advanced study of Hebrew grammar and exegesis of the Hebrew Bible.
This grammar introduces undergraduate and graduate students to the essentials of classical Hebrew. It begins with the simple and regular elements of the language and proceeds to the complex and irregular, frequently referencing the historical development of Hebrew. Extensive explanations of elements in English prepare students for the discussion of the corresponding Hebrew element. Through the course of the text, the reader will translate the book of Ruth as well as other biblical and nonbiblical texts, learning particular skills in reading both the entire Hebrew Bible and the later sixth-century Hebrew material, such as the Lachish Letter. Accomplished students of this text will be prepared to progress to advanced study of Hebrew grammar and exegesis of the Hebrew Bible.
This book is the first detailed investigation of the translation of the Hebrew verbs of Chronicles into Greek, especially from the perspective of two diachronic developments: that of the Hebrew verbal system and that of the trend toward a more literal translation of the Bible. The translation provides a view of the Hebrew verbal system in the Hellenistic period (approx. 150 BCE) as part of the continuum in the development of the Hebrew verbal system from classical biblical Hebrew to Mishnaic Hebrew. The translation also testifies to the trend in the process of the translation of the Bible from the freer (but still literal) translation of the Pentateuch and Samuel/Kings to the slavishly literal translation of Aquila.
Linguistic Innovations in the Writings of the Second Temple Period
The Hebrew language may be divided into the Biblical, Mishnaic, Medieval, and Modern ‎periods. Biblical Hebrew has its own distinct linguistic profile, exhibiting a diversity of styles ‎and linguistic traditions extending over some one thousand years as well as tangible diachronic ‎developments that may serve as chronological milestones in tracing the linguistic history of ‎Biblical Hebrew. Unlike standard dictionaries, whose scope and extent are dictated by the contents of the ‎Biblical concordance, this lexicon includes only 80 lexical entries, chosen specifically for a ‎diachronic investigation of Late Biblical Hebrew. Selected primarily to illustrate the fifth-century ‘watershed’ separating Classical from ‎post-Classical Biblical Hebrew, emphasis is placed on ‘linguistic contrasts’ illuminated by a rich collection ‎of examples contrasting Classical Biblical Hebrew with Late Biblical Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew with Rabbinic Hebrew, and Hebrew with Aramaic.‎
Essays in Semitics and Old Testament Texts in Honour of Professor Jan P. Lettinga
For half a century Jan P. Lettinga (1921), Professor emeritus of Semitic Languages at the Theological University Kampen (Broederweg), greatly influenced the teaching of Biblical Hebrew in the Faculties of Theology, Religious Studies and Semitic Languages in the Netherlands and Belgium by his widely used grammar. This volume honours his legacy and reputation as a Semitist. Lettinga always asked how a historical approach of the Semitic languages and literature would contribute to their understanding, and how this elucidates our reading of the Hebrew Scriptures. Biblical Hebrew in Context applies this approach to issues reflecting the full breadth of Lettinga’s interests: Mesopotamian and Biblical Law, the history, grammar and teaching of Hebrew and Aramaic, and the translation and interpretation of Ugaritic and Old Testament texts.
This volume offers a thematic study of an integral part of the Hebrew text of Esther, namely, violence. In The Dynamics of Violence and Revenge in the Hebrew Book of Esther, Francisco-Javier Ruiz-Ortiz makes the first ever monographic research on the topics of hostility and the mechanisms of revenge as expressed by the author of the Hebrew book of Esther.

The present book is divided into two parts consisting of three chapters each. After an introductory chapter reviewing previous studies on the book of Esther, the author analyses the main vocabulary of violence and revenge in this biblical text before studying the narrative of Esther from the point of view of violence. The results of these two avenues of research are then applied on three pericopes which are representative of the dynamics of violence. Each of the chosen texts illustrates how violence and revenge are used by the author to express the message of survival and the importance of the Jewish people.
with Special Reference to the First Book of the Psalter
This volume deals with the poetic framework and material content of the book of Psalms. The rhetorical analyses of Psalms 1-41 are preceded by a broad survey of the history of strophic investigation into Hebrew poetry, starting from the beginning of the nineteenth century.
Formal and thematic devices demonstrate that the psalms are composed of a consistent pattern of cantos (stanzas) and strophes. The formal devices include quantitative balance on the level of cantos in terms of the number of verselines, verbal repetitions and transition markers. A quantitative structural approach also helps to identify the focal message of the poems.
An introduction to the design of biblical poetry, describing the fundamentals that determine the macrostructure of individual compositions, concludes this massive study.