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* Redie Bereketeab is Associate Professor of Sociology. Currently he is a senior researcher at the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, Sweden. He runs a research project on Conflict and State Building in the Horn of Africa. Introduction Four outstanding features characterize the Horn of

In: African and Asian Studies

An archaeological survey was carried out by a French team in November and December 2002 in the Somaliland Republic. The objective was the search for rock shelters and caves containing stratified archaeological infills capable of documenting the period when production economy appeared in this part of the Horn of Africa (circa 5th and 2nd millenia B.C.). The Las Geel site, a granite rock sheltering about ten shelters decorated with polychrome paintings, was discovered in the course of the survey. These paintings, in an excellent state of preservation, mainly represent humpless cows with large lyre-shaped or arched horns and the neck decorated with a kind of „plastron”. The cows are accompanied by stocky human figures with spindel-shape legs and raised arms. There are also some figures of canidae placed beside men, a single giraffe and some antelopes. The evident superposition of several graphic styles will no doubt make it possible to establish a chronology of Neolithic or Protohistoric rock art in this part of the Horn of Africa. Through the abundance of its paintings, their quality, the originality of the type of representation of bovines and human figures, the Las Geel site will henceforth take its place among the major Holocene sites of rock art in this region of Africa. A future mission planned for November 2003 will make it possible to undertake a detailed study of these paintings and their archaeological context. This note constitutes a preliminary presentation of this exceptional discovery.

In: Journal of African Archaeology

HICKS, Esther K. Infibulation: female mutilation in Islamic northeastern Africa, 2nd ed., rev. and expanded. New Brunswick: Transaction, 1996. 319pp. [Sudan, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Jibuti, Somalia. First published 1993.] BADAWI, Maisoun & HORN, T.. Islamic law and women in the Horn of Africa - two

Introduction The East African peninsula, called the Horn of Africa, is the easternmost projection of the continent and encompasses the countries of Eritrea, Djibouti, Ethiopia and Somalia. The biodiversity of the Horn of Africa is driven by at least two main factors: (1) dramatic

In: Amphibia-Reptilia

understand cultural change. This is especially important for the end of the Pleistocene where a growing body of genetic studies document complex patterns of dispersals within, out of, and back into Africa (e.g. Campbell & Tishkoff 2010; Hodgson et al. 2014). In the Horn of Africa particularly few sites

In: Journal of African Archaeology

http://www.hananews.org/index.asp A news site for East Africa, the Horn of Africa, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia and Sudan. It also offers separate news on the topics of health, sports and human rights, besides editorials, special reports and commentaries. [12/03/12]...

In: African Studies Companion Online

Bibliographic entry in Chapter 23: The United States and Sub-Saharan Africa since 1961 | U.S. Foreign Relations with Particular Nations and Regions authorFrancis, Samuel T.imprintJournal of Social and Political Studies 2 (Fall 1977): 131-42.annotationThe conflict within the Horn of Africa affects

In: The SHAFR Guide Online

Bibliographic entry in Chapter 23: The United States and Sub-Saharan Africa since 1961 | U.S. Foreign Relations with Particular Nations and Regions authorZelniker, ShimshonimprintTel Aviv: Tel Aviv University, 1982.annotationThis booklet, which focuses on the Horn of Africa during the 1970s

In: The SHAFR Guide Online
Author: Ottaway, Marina

Bibliographic entry in Chapter 23: The United States and Sub-Saharan Africa since 1961 | U.S. Foreign Relations with Particular Nations and Regions authorOttaway, MarinaimprintNew York: Praeger, 1982.annotationOttaway's study examines both American and Soviet influence in the Horn of Africa and how

In: The SHAFR Guide Online
Eventually to be completed in six volumes Arabic Literature of Africa will provide a survey of Muslim authors writing in Arabic in Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa and a bibliography of their works. Falling within the tradition of the great works of Brockelmann and Sezgin, it will form a basic reference tool for the study of Arabic writing in areas of the African Islamic world that fall outside the parameters of these works. While primarily a work of reference, it will also attempt to provide an outline of the intellectual history of Muslim societies in the areas it covers: the Nile valley, East Africa and the Horn of Africa, West Africa and the western Sahara, from earliest times to the present.