International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) granted early release to 47 individuals, i.e. 85 per cent of those released at the time. For each of these individuals, the President assessed their level of rehabilitation, considered it

In: International Criminal Law Review
Author: Dominik Steiger

‘Slow and steady, that’s the way to win the race’. This sentence, uttered on the courtyard of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) by one of the senior legal advisors of the ICTR’s chambers in 2011, captures the complexities international actors face when they set out to

In: International Criminal Law Review

I NTERNATIONAL O RGANIZATIONS L AW R EVIEW brill.nl/iolr © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2012 DOI: 10.1163/157237411X633863 The International Residual Mechanism for Criminal tribunals: The Beginning of the end for the ICtY and ICtR Brigitte Benoit Landale a) and Huw Llewellyn b) * a) Legal

In: International Organizations Law Review

International Criminal Law Review 11 (2011) 745–773 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI 10.1163/157181211X587193 brill.nl/icla International Criminal Law Review Punishment for Genocide – Exploratory Analysis of ICTR Sentencing Barbora Hola , Catrien Bijleveld and Alette Smeulers Faculty of

In: International Criminal Law Review
Author: Roberta Arnold

providing for the security of the witnesses. Trips were even undertaken to the ICTR to learn about its prac- tice and measures were adopted to prevent a “cultural shock”. Notwithstanding the ten- dency of some human rights advocates to be very critical of military tribunals, in the Niyonteze Trial the Swiss

In: International Criminal Law Review

international standards. Th e ICTY’s approach has been followed by the ICTR and the SCSL, though each tribunal made important advances in victim and witness protection. Today, ICC continues to follow the lead of the other tribunals. Although it is still unknown how well the ICC will protect victims and

In: The Law & Practice of International Courts and Tribunals
Author: Emily Crawford

, the ictr in particular, were pivotal in progressively developing the international law of genocide, and the law of non-international armed conflict. With this background in mind, this article will explore how and why the ictr was pivotal to reviving international criminal law after Nuremburg and

In: Journal of International Peacekeeping

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/157180311X582161 The Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals 10 (2011) 351–380 brill.nl/lape Procedural Developments at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) Tamfuh Y.N. Wilson* Senior Lecturer, Department of Law

In: The Law & Practice of International Courts and Tribunals

on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (hereinafter referred to as the Genocide Convention). 3 With the inchoate crime of direct and public incitement to commit genocide made punishable, 4 the Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), in defining the crime

In: International Criminal Law Review
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