The Judicial Reports/Recueils judiciaires of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) comprise (in English and French) all Judgments by both Trial Chambers and the Appeals Chamber as well as their most significant Decisions and Orders issued in a given year.
Author: ICTY
The Judicial Reports/Recueils judiciaires of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) comprise (in English and French) all Judgments by both Trial Chambers and the Appeals Chamber as well as their most significant Decisions and Orders issued in a given year.
The publication is aimed at giving lawyers, scholars, students and the general public convenient access to the historic work of the ICTY, which was established pursuant to United Nations Security Council Resolution
827 in 1993 to try individuals accused of serious violations of international humanitarian law committed in the territory of the former Yugoslavia since 1991.
The Judicial Reports are organized chronologically by case. Within each case, one will find the selected materials, including separate and/or dissenting opinions that may accompany a given Trial Chamber or Appeals Chamber ruling.
The Judicial Reports will contribute to a greater knowledge of the judicial activities of the ICTY. Various annexes, such as various tables of cases and a table of references will facilitate the use of these volumes.

International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) granted early release to 47 individuals, i.e. 85 per cent of those released at the time. For each of these individuals, the President assessed their level of rehabilitation, considered it

In: International Criminal Law Review

I NTERNATIONAL O RGANIZATIONS L AW R EVIEW brill.nl/iolr © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2012 DOI: 10.1163/157237411X633863 The International Residual Mechanism for Criminal tribunals: The Beginning of the end for the ICtY and ICtR Brigitte Benoit Landale a) and Huw Llewellyn b) * a) Legal

In: International Organizations Law Review
Author: Hansdeep Singh

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2009 DOI: 10.1163/157180309X451105 Th e Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals 8 (2009) 247–296 brill.nl/lape Critique of the Mrkšić Trial Chamber (ICTY) Judgment: A Re-evaluation on Whether Soldiers Hors de Combat Are Entitled to Recognition as

In: The Law & Practice of International Courts and Tribunals
At the dawn of the International Criminal Court, the rich experience of the ad hoc International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) will prove to be the primary source of legal authorities for many years. The creation of the ICTY in 1993 heralded a new-found willingness of the international community to bring to book perpetrators of war crimes and gross or systematic violations of human rights. Written by academics and practitioners, and notably many "insiders" at the ICTY, this volume focuses particularly on the international and criminal law developments that have taken place in the practice and procedure of the Tribunal. Throughout are threads concerning the development and application of international criminal law not only by the ICTY, but also by the ad hoc International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the new International Criminal Court.

revitalizing economic activity. 3 In this context, cooperation with the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (“ icty ” or “Tribunal”) has been one crucial condition for membership in the eu , 4 reiterated at any occasion and in any document that related to the eu -Balkan relations. 5

In: European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice
Author: Eric Gordy

Having appeared for trial 1 at the ICTY shortly after being charged in 1996 with crimes in Lašva valley – in spite of his government’s effort to demonstrate defiance and shield him from prosecution – Tihomir Blaškić was one of the first high-ranking military officers to be prosecuted and

In: Southeastern Europe
Author: Jelena Subotić

since the very beginning of the process. Plavšić is a rare woman who held high office in the wartime Bosnian Serb leadership, and a lone woman accused of genocide in front of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague. She is also unique among high

In: Southeastern Europe
This collection of essays assesses the legacy established by the most important international criminal tribunal since the Nuremberg and Tokyo war crimes trials, and considers what might be done to enhance or modify the legacy of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), including improvement of the capacity of state courts in the region to prosecute violations of humanitarian law by using the Tribunal’s documents, evidence, law, and practice.

The essays are derived from a conference, Assessing the Legacy of the ICTY, which was convened in The Hague. Participants included over 375 stakeholders from the former Yugoslavia; officials from the Tribunal’s Chambers, Registry, and the Office of the Prosecutor; justice ministers and other government officials from Europe; and all elements of civil society—representatives of nongovernmental organizations, lawyers, and academics.