Author: Andrew Davies

Biblical Interpretation 15 (2007) 464-484 www.brill.nl/bi Biblical Interpretation orn © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2007 DOI: 10.1163/156851507X216508 Oratorio as Exegesis: e Use of the Book of Isaiah in Handel’s Messiah Andrew Davies Mattersey Hall Graduate School Abstract Handel’s Messiah

In: Biblical Interpretation

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/147783508X393048 Aramaic Studies 6 . 2 ( 2008 ) 195 – 206 Aramaic Studies www.brill.nl/arst Sin, Iniquity, Wickedness, and Rebellion in the Peshitta to Isaiah and Jeremiah Gillian Greenberg University College London Abstract The Peshitta is

In: Aramaic Studies
Author: Aaron Demsky

@mail.biu.ac.il Abstract Ba ʿ yâm in Isaiah 11:15 is the Hebrew form of the dynastic eponym Bah ̮ iān, and refers in Isaiah to the head waters of the river Habur, also called the river Gozan. Keywords Isaiah; Genesis Apocryphon; Habur; Assyrian exile For Anson Rainey Friend, colleague and mentor Esther Eshel has recently

In: Dead Sea Discoveries

these research projects is to provide a thorough analysis of the translation character of LXX Canticles, which is lacking to this day. 2) Unless indicated otherwise, all provisional translations are the authors’. Greek Renderings of the Hebrew Lexeme hmx in LXX Canticles and Isaiah Reinhart Ceulemans

In: Vetus Testamentum
Studies of an Interpretive Tradition
Vol 1: This first part of a 2-volume work, this study combines recent approaches that treat the formation and early interpretation of the final form of the book of Isaiah with the more conventional historical-critical methods that treat the use of traditions by Isaiah's authors and editors. Studies investigate Isaiah's use of early sacred tradition, the editing and contextualization of oracles within the Isaianic tradition itself, and the interpretation of the book of Isaiah in later traditions (as seen in the various versions of the text and various communities).
Contributors of this volume include virtually all of the major scholars of Isaiah and the leading scholars of biblical interpretation in the intertestamental, New Testament, and early Jewish periods.


Vol. 2: The second part of a 2-volume work, this study combines recent approaches that treat the formation and early interpretation of the final form of the book of Isaiah with the more conventional historical-critical methods that treat the use of traditions by Isaiah's authors and editors. Studies investigate Isaiah's use of early sacred tradition, the editing and contextualization of oracles within the Isaianic tradition itself, and the interpretation of the book of Isaiah in later traditions (as seen in the various versions of the text and various communities).
Contributors of this volume include virtually all of the major scholars of Isaiah and the leading scholars of biblical interpretation in the intertestamental, New Testament, and early Jewish periods
.
Author: Ken Penner
This work consists of an introduction, transcription, translation, and commentary to the Greek translation of Isaiah in the Codex Sinaiticus. It comments on the Greek language in its context, especially on how the Greek language is stretched beyond its normal range of function. It addresses the peculiarities of Codex Sinaiticus, including its history, scribes, divisions, and orthography. In line with the aims of the Brill Septuagint Commentary Series, it mainly discusses not how the text was produced, but how it was read.

Vetus Testamentum 57 (2007) 367-385 Vetus Testamentum www.brill.nl/vt © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2007 DOI: 10.1163/156853307X190732 Geography and Textual Allusions: Interpreting Isaiah xl-lv and Lamentations as Judahite Texts 1 Lena-Sofia Tiemeyer Aberdeen Abstract Th is article proposes a

In: Vetus Testamentum
Author: J. Lyle Story

promise, wherein God wills to accomplish his purposes for his people, despite his repeated frustration with human rebellion. God expresses his love for his people in a wholly vulnerable manner. Both Isaiah and Jesus underscore the truth that God could do nothing more than he had already done for his

In: Horizons in Biblical Theology
Approaching the Role of Food and Drink in Isaiah's Structure and Message
In Eating in Isaiah Andrew Abernethy employs a sequential-synchronic approach to explore the role of eating in the structure and message of the book of Isaiah. By focusing on 'scaffolding' chapters (Isaiah 1; 36–37; 55; 65-66), avenues open for exploring how eating operates within the major sections of Isaiah and how the motif enhances the book's coherence. Furthermore, occurrences of eating in Isaiah create networks of association that grant perspective on significant topics in the book's message, such as Zion, YHWH’s kingship, and YHWH's servants. Amidst growing scholarly interest in food and drink within biblical literature, Eating in Isaiah demonstrates how eating can operate at a literary level within a prophetic book.