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1 Introduction Abū l-Faraǧ ibn Yaʿqūb ibn Isḥāq Ibn al-Quff (d. 1286) is not much known outside the field of medieval Islamic medicine. 1 He was born in 1233 and was raised in a Melkite Christian family in Karak in Greater Syria. He came from a scholarly medical family, and it

In: Oriens

Introduction In this paper, I examine transformations in Galen’s (d. ca. 216) medical legacy in late-antique genres of medical writing from the end of the classical into the post-classical period of Islamic medicine. 1 The body of Arabic commentaries on the Aphorisms together with

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

Literatur/Book Reviews / Die Welt des Islams 49 (2009) 122-161 151 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2009 DOI: 10.1163/157006008X425039 Medieval Islamic Medicine. By Peter Pormann & Emilie Savage-Smith. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007 (e New Edinburgh Islamic Surveys). xiv + 223 pp

In: Die Welt des Islams
Studies in Ancient Medicine Online is the electronic version of the series Studies in Ancient Medicine. Studies in Ancient Medicine considers the medical traditions of ancient civilizations. The Graeco-Roman traditions are the focus of the series, but Byzantine, Medieval and early Islamic medicine is also included, as is medicine in Egyptian, Near Eastern, Armenian and other related cultures.

The series is intended for readers with interests in Classics, Ancient History, Ancient Philosophy, Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, History of Medicine and Science, Intellectual History, Byzantium, Islam, as well as for those whose professional involvement in medical practice gives them an interest in the history and traditions of their field.

The series includes monographs, critical editions, translations and commentaries on medical texts and collective volumes on the theory and practice of public and private medicine in Antiquity and the Middle Ages, drawing on written sources and other historical and archaeological evidence. The series also contains annotated bibliographies of published works relevant to particular subfields and lexica of medical terms in the various ancient traditions.

Studies in Ancient Medicine considers the medical traditions of ancient civilizations. The Graeco-Roman traditions are the focus of the series, but Byzantine, Medieval and early Islamic medicine is also included, as is medicine in Egyptian, Near Eastern, Armenian and other related cultures.

The series is intended for readers with interests in Classics, Ancient History, Ancient Philosophy, Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, History of Medicine and Science, Intellectual History, Byzantium, Islam, as well as for those whose professional involvement in medical practice gives them an interest in the history and traditions of their field.

The series includes monographs, critical editions, translations and commentaries on medical texts and collective volumes on the theory and practice of public and private medicine in Antiquity and the Middle Ages, drawing on written sources and other historical and archaeological evidence. The series also contains annotated bibliographies of published works relevant to particular subfields and lexica of medical terms in the various ancient traditions.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Editor / Translator: Oliver Kahl
The Arabic treatise edited and translated here was written in the middle of the 9th century CE by ʿAlī ibn Sahl Rabban aṭ-Ṭabarī, a Christian convert to Islam and one of the most remarkable thinkers of his time. The text can be described as a manual towards the preservation of health, addressed directly to the ʿAbbāsid caliph al-Mutawakkil and his household. It represents not only the oldest extant specimen of its kind, but is also distinguished by its largely non-technical language, as well as by a narrative style that creates an unusual interface with classical Arabic prose literature. The Greek and Indian sources upon which aṭ-Ṭabarī relied testify to the synthetic and inclusive character of early Islamic medicine.
Authors: Efraim Lev and Leigh Chipman

prescriptions about medicine, public/community health, the use of materia medica ? To what extent are these prescriptions original, i.e. how do they reflect the relationship between medieval medical theory and practice? Keywords prescriptions, Islamic medicine, medieval pharmacology, Cairo Genizah Pharmacology

In: Asian Medicine
Author: Paul D. Buell

The name of Rashīd al-Dīn (1247-1317) is associated with the transmission of considerable medical lore from China to Mongol Iran and the Islamic World. In fact, Rashīd al-Dīn was only at one end of the exchange, and while Chinese medical knowledge, including lore about pulsing and the Chinese view of anatomy, went west, Islamic medical knowledge went east, where Islamic medicine became the preferred medicine of the Mongol elite in China. The paper traces this process and considers who may have been involved and what specific traditions in an ongoing process of medical globalisation.

In: Asian Medicine
Author: Nahyan Fancy

commentaries a sign of the “decline” of medicine in Islamic societies. As the eminent historian of Islamic medicine, Max Meyerhof, stated in his 1931 chapter, “Science and Medicine,” The twelfth century marks a standstill. The works of Rhazes, Avicenna, and ‘Jābir’ are reproduced, summarized

In: Oriens

. Finding a fragment of Sābūr’s pharmacopoeia in the Cairo Genizah shows that it was used by the medical practitioners of the Jewish community of Cairo, possibly long after it is supposed to have been superseded by other works. Keywords Cairo Genizah, pharmacology, Judaeo-Arabic, Islamic medicine

In: Medieval Encounters