incomplete Sanskrit inscription found in the south gate of the Jami Masjid at Jaunpur has traditionally been ascribed to the Maukhari king of Kanauj ¯ I ´ svaravar- man (first half of 6th century). Collation of this inscription with another Maukhari inscription (the Haraha Stone Inscription of ¯ I

In: Indo-Iranian Journal
The World of the Skandapurāṇa explores the historical, religious and literary environment that gave rise to the composition and spread of this early Purana text devoted to Siva. It is argued that the text originated in circles of Pasupata ascetics and laymen, probably in Benares, in the second half of the 6th and first half of he 7th centuries. The book describes the political developments in Northern India after the fall of the Gupta Empire until the successor states which arose after the death of king Harsavardhana of Kanauj in the second half of the 7th century. The work consists of two parts. In the first part the historical environment in which this Purāṇa was composed is described. The second part explores six localities in Northern India that play a prominent role in the text. It is richly illustrated and contains a detailed bibliography and index.


In this volume, André Wink analyzes the beginning of the process of momentous and long-term change that came with the Islamization of the regions that the Arabs called al-Hind—India and large parts of its Indianized hinterland. In the seventh to eleventh centuries, the expansion of Islam had a largely commercial impact on al-Hind. In the peripheral states of the Indian subcontinent, fluid resources, intensive raiding and trading activity, as well as social and political fluidity and openness produced a dynamic impetus that was absent in the densely settled agricultural heartland. Shifts of power occurred, in combination with massive transfers of wealth across multiple centers along the periphery of al-Hind. These multiple centers mediated between the world of mobile wealth on the Islamic-Sino-Tibetan frontier (which extended into Southeast Asia) and the world of sedentary agriculture, epitomized by brahmanical temple Hinduism in and around Kanauj in the heartland. The growth and development of a world economy in and around the Indian Ocean—with India at its center and the Middle East and China as its two dynamic poles—was effected by continued economic, social, and cultural integration into ever wider and more complex patterns under the aegis of Islam.

Please note that Early medieval India and the expansion of Islam 7th-11th centuries was previously published by Brill in hardback (ISBN 90 04 09249 8, still available).
The making of the Indo-Islamic world
Volume I
In this volume, André Wink analyzes the beginning of the process of momentous and long-term change that came with the Islamization of the regions that the Arabs called al-Hind—India and large parts of its Indianized hinterland. In the seventh to eleventh centuries, the expansion of Islam had a largely commercial impact on al-Hind. In the peripheral states of the Indian subcontinent, fluid resources, intensive raiding and trading activity, as well as social and political fluidity and openness produced a dynamic impetus that was absent in the densely settled agricultural heartland. Shifts of power occurred, in combination with massive transfers of wealth across multiple centers along the periphery of al-Hind. These multiple centers mediated between the world of mobile wealth on the Islamic-Sino-Tibetan frontier (which extended into Southeast Asia) and the world of sedentary agriculture, epitomized by brahmanical temple Hinduism in and around Kanauj in the heartland. The growth and development of a world economy in and around the Indian Ocean—with India at its center and the Middle East and China as its two dynamic poles—was effected by continued economic, social, and cultural integration into ever wider and more complex patterns under the aegis of Islam.

Early medieval India and the expansion of Islam 7th-11th centuries is also available in hardback (isbn 90 04 09249 8)

Volume II
During the early medieval Islamic expansion in the seventh to eleventh centuries, al-Hind (India and its Indianized hinterland) was characterized by two organizational modes: the long-distance trade and mobile wealth of the peripheral frontier states, and the settled agriculture of the heartland. These two different types of social, economic, and political organization were successfully fused during the eleventh to thirteenth centuries, and India became the hub of world trade. During this period, the Middle East declined in importance, Central Asia was unified under the Mongols, and Islam expanded far into the Indian subcontinent. Instead of being devastated by the Mongols, who were prevented from penetrating beyond the western periphery of al-Hind by the absence of sufficient good pasture land, the agricultural plains of North India were brought under Turko-Islamic rule in a gradual manner in a conquest effected by professional armies and not accompanied by any large-scale nomadic invasions. The result of the conquest was, in short, the revitalization of the economy of settled agriculture through the dynamic impetus of forced monetization and the expansion of political dominion. Islamic conquest and trade laid the foundation for a new type of Indo-Islamic society in which the organizational forms of the frontier and of sedentary agriculture merged in a way that was uniquely successful in the late medieval world at large, setting the Indo-Islamic world apart from the Middle East and China in the same centuries.

The Slave Kings and the Islamic Conquest, 11th-13th Centuries is also available in hardback (ISBN 90 04 10236 1)

formed one political or administrative unit.i) With many prosperous cities along the Ganges, it seems probable that riparian commerce was as vigorous as ever. Though of early origin, Harsha's capital of Kanauj did not emerge until after the Gupta period. It had been a leading city in early Buddhist times

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

of East Panjab. In the latter half of that century the Maukharis, having occupied Kanauj, claimed the imperial status but were challenged by a combination of the Later Guptas and the Gauda king 8a§aika. This conflict brought the Puspab- hati prince Harsa (606-647) on the throne of Kanauj, and, in the

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

historiography of early medieval north India the P¤las are por- trayed as intensely involved in the struggle for mastery over K¤nyakubja (= Kanauj near Kanpur, U.P. in the Ganga-Yamuna doab) with the Gurjara Pra- tih¤ras of Rajputana and the R¤×ßrakâßas of the Deccan. The heyday of the P¤las saw their occupation

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

city of Kanauj and of King Yasovarman. By Vincent A. SMITH. _ January, 1909. - Marco Polo's Travels; new editions; his "Arbre Sol" not "Stiii-tree" but Cypress of Zoroaster. - By A. HouTU? -?CHI?1DLER. Teheran. October 20, 1908. - Dr, S. W. Bushell, C. M. G. Obituary i?Totice. April, 1909. - A short

In: T'oung Pao

perspective, or he may introduce new emotional settings. Among the many distinctly individual poetic voices, Bāṇa stands out not just because of his bold creativity but also as the perhaps most influential Sanskrit poet. His “sons”, poets working in the royal courts of Kanauj and under Pāla patronage in

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

of the sixth or early seventh century. It follows that the otherwise completely unknown Mahāsāmanta Udayasena was a feudatory, not of Harṣavardhana, but of the Maukharis, and most likely ruled under Avantivarman, the last of the great Maukhari kings of Kanauj, whose reign spanned the final decades of

In: Indo-Iranian Journal