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RICHARD C. BORDEN TIME, BACKWARD!: SASHA SOKOLOV AND VALENTIN KATAEV W h e n S a s h a Sokolov m a d e h i s l i t e r a r y d e b u t in 1976 w i t h A School for Fools, i t w a s i n e v i t a b l e t h a t critics would seek sources of i n f l u e n c e for a w o r k so s t a r t l i n g l y

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies
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Valentin Kataev (1897-1986), Leonid Borisov (1897-1972), and Sergei Esenin (1895-1925), who had all experienced the fi rst Pinkerton craze as 10- and 12-year-olds, indicate that these colorful, readily accessible parables of Manichean justice in exotic locales allowed young readers to displace their own

In: Russian History
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This new edition of the Catalogue of Palaearctic Coleoptera gives a taxonomic overview of the most diverse group of all organisms living in the world-largest biogeographical area. The present volume is an updated edition of the first issue in 2003 but restricted to data published before the year 2000. It contains information about 33,914 taxa (together with synonyms), and increases the number of included species and other taxa by almost 5,000. In addition, thousands of species have their distributional data completed, and their ranks, systematic positions and nomenclature corrected. Almost two hundred new acts fix systematics and nomenclature, and numerous problems are discussed. Even such well known genera as Calosoma and Carabus, or tribes as Bembidiini and Panagaeini, are completely reorganized compared to the previously published catalogues. Thus, the work is a scaffold for biotic surveys, ecological studies, and nature conservation. It responds to the urgent need of an assessment of the still remaining forms of life, threatened by the on-going destruction of habitats. Taxonomy provides the basic building blocks of our understanding of the diversity of life. It stems from innate human curiosity: confronted with an unknown species we ask first “what is it”? Taxonomists recognize species and other systematic entities (taxa), define them and place them within the framework of known organisms, providing means for their subsequent identification.

Contributors are: Antonio Tomás Tomas Andújar, Carmelo Fernández Andújar, Michael Balkenohl, Igor Belousov, Yves Bousquet, Boleslav Březina, Achille Casale, Hans Fery, Jan Farkač, Pier Mauro Giachino, Henri Goulet, Martin Häckel, Jiří Hájek, Oldřich Hovorka, Fritz Hieke, Jan Hrdlička, Charles Huber, Bernd Jaeger, Ilya Kabak, Boris M. Kataev, Erich Kirschenhofer, Tomáš Kopecký, Ivan Löbl, Werner Marggi, Andrey Matalin, Wendy Moore, Peter Nagel, Paolo Neri, Sergio Pérez González, Alexandr Putchkov, James A. Robertson, Joachim Schmidt, José Serrano, Luca Toledano, Uldis Valainis, Bernhard J. van Vondel, David W. Wrase, Juan M. Pérez Zaballos, Alexandr S. Zamotajlov.

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that of St. Petersburg in Russian literature, one which was consciously developed as a counterweight to its northern equivalent. Authors such as Olesha and Kataev – and Babel above all – favored memoiristic or confessional, purportedly autobiographical narratives conjuring a sun-drenched, cosmopolitan

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies
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).27 although Britikov and nikolaev don’t expressly call erenburg’s novel—or its viciously satirical picaresque predecessor, The Extraordinary Adventures of Julio Jurenito [Neobychainye pokhozhdeniia Khulio Khurenito] (1922)—“red pinkertons,” they do consider kataev’s parody of erenburg’s novels, Erendorf

In: Western Crime Fiction Goes East
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constituted one of wrestling’s most ardent fanbases and were understandably swept away by the marvel of manned flight.29 Confirmation comes from a predictable source, valentin kataev’s A Shattered Life, which, as we have seen, also offers one of the best reminiscences of the pinkerton craze. Conveniently

In: Western Crime Fiction Goes East
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letters by Valentin kataev (1897–1986), leonid Borisov (1897–1972), and sergei esenin (1895–1925), who had all experienced the first pinkerton craze as 10- and 12-year-olds, indicate that these colorful, readily accessible parables of Manichean justice in exotic locales allowed young readers to

In: Western Crime Fiction Goes East
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intruding on her very smart literary readings. In her chapter on the 1930s, she includes Valentin Kataev and his book Time Forward! , even though she says quite clearly that, although he’s Jewish, his writing does not reflect the Jewish literature of his contemporaneous colleagues (68). This inclusion

In: The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review
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(1932) reveals the growing consolidation of the Socialist Realist strategy, before its was officially codified in 1934. In his fourth and final chapter, Laursen uses Fedor Gladkov’s Cement (1925) and Valentin Kataev’s Time Forward! (1932) to trace the gradual disambiguation and muffling of

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies