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Kati Parppei

Introduction The Battle of Kulikovo took place in 1380 between the troops commanded by Muscovite Grand Prince Dmitrii Ivanovich and Mongolian Emir Mamai. In the Russian national historiography, the event has been considered as a major turning point in Russian history, making way for the

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The Battle of Kulikovo Refought

“The First National Feat”

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Kati M.J. Parppei

The battle of Kulikovo, fought between Muscovite and Tatar troops in 1380, has been considered as a crucial turning point in the national history of Russia. In The Battle of Kulikovo Refought Kati Parppei examines the layers of contemporary meanings attached to the event from the Middle Ages to the present, following the formation and establishment of the collective images and perceptions concerning the battle.

By utilizing a diverse set of sources she shows that the present image of the medieval battle was created in retrospect from the 15th century onwards by interpolating, interpreting and simplifying. The narrative themes emphasizing internal unity have been applicable to practically any political situation over the centuries, especially to ones involving external threat.
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Kati Parppei

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Robert Mann

NOTE ROBERT MANN (Eugene, Or., U.S.A.) The Kulikovo Battle and the Bylina about the Two Lithuanian Brothers The Kulikovo Battle of 1380 inspired an entire cycle of literary works commemorating the Russians' victory over the Tatars. The Kulikovo cycle in- cludes the Zadonshchina ("The Epic Tale

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CHARLES J. HALPERIN

-hundredth anniversary o f the 1380 battle o f Kulikovo Field, at which Grand Prince Dmitrii Ivanovich Donskoi defeated a Tatar army led by Emir Mamai, was celebrated in the Soviet Union by the appearance o f books, articles, and albums; by the organization o f scholarly conferences and exhibitions; and by the opening

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Collective Imagery Concerning the Battle of Kulikovo  217–241 Kati Parppei REVIEW ARTICLE Preserving the Balance of Power in Muscovy  243–247 Carolyn J. Pouncy VOLUME 42, NO. 3 ARTICLES A Failure of Modernization: Police Reform, The “Common Good,” and

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Charles J. Halperin

Bassin, “Narrative Kulikovo: Lev Gumilev, Russian Nationalists, and the Troubled Emergence of Neo-Eurasianism” (165–86) questions two assertions of contemporary Neo-Eurasianism, one, that it derives “doctrinal authority” from (classical) Eurasianism which has non-Soviet legitimacy, and two, that it

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Dmitry Shlapentokh

ethnic Russians. Mark Bassin’s “Narrative Kulikovo” deals with the subject. It focused on the conflict between Eurasianists and Russian nationalists in late Soviet Russia. The leader of “Eurasianists” or, to be precise, the only known “Eurasianist” in late Soviet Russia was Lev Gumilev, at that time

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Isoaho

This study examines the evolution of the image of Aleksandr Nevskiy in close connection with the dynamics of the political and cultural history of medieval Russia. It demonstrates that historians often misinterpret the Life of Aleksandr Nevskiy and treat it as a source for political and military history. By putting the Life in the context of Christian (not only Orthodox) culture, the study achieves remarkable and impressive results in its analysis of the Life. With its mature and innovative methodology it also demonstrates how the Life impacted on common historical consciousness, as it was placed into the historical framework of the medieval Russian chronicles. This researches places Isoaho among those scholars of medieval Russian history, who study the role of political leaders in the formation of the Russian state.