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works like those of Che IJPT 1,3-4_f6_338-363.indd 342 IJPT 1,3-4_f6_338-363.indd 342 9/13/07 1:36:10 PM 9/13/07 1:36:10 PM R. von Sinner / International Journal of Public Th eology 1 (2007) 338–363 343 parallels between liberation theologies, European political theology and North American black

In: International Journal of Public Theology
David Tombs offers an accessible introduction to the theological challenges raised by Latin American Liberation and a new contribution to how these challenges might be understood as a chronological sequence. Liberation theology emerged in the 1960s in Latin America and thrived until it reached a crisis in the 1990s. This work traces the distinct developments in thought through the decades, thus presenting a contextual theology. The book is divided into five main sections: the historical role of the church from Columbus’s arrival in 1492 until the Cuban revolution of 1959; the reform and renewal decade of the 1960s; the transitional decade of the 1970s; the revision and redirection of liberation theology in the 1980s; and a crisis of relevance in the 1990s. This book offers insights into liberation theology’s profound contributions for any socially engaged theology of the future and is crucial to understanding liberation theology and its legacies.

This publication has also been published in paperback, please click here for details.
David Tombs offers an accessible introduction to the theological challenges raised by Latin American Liberation and a new contribution to how these challenges might be understood as a chronological sequence. Liberation theology emerged in the 1960s in Latin America and thrived until it reached a crisis in the 1990s. This work traces the distinct developments in thought through the decades, thus presenting a contextual theology. The book is divided into five main sections: the historical role of the church from Columbus’s arrival in 1492 until the Cuban revolution of 1959; the reform and renewal decade of the 1960s; the transitional decade of the 1970s; the revision and redirection of liberation theology in the 1980s; and a crisis of relevance in the 1990s. This book offers insights into liberation theology’s profound contributions for any socially engaged theology of the future and is crucial to understanding liberation theology and its legacies.

This publication has also been published in hardback, please click here for details.

it becomes an appropriated commodity form by universities or other corporatized entities. The same with online teaching in virtual learning factories where what cannot be digitalized loses value and significance. 2 Karl Marx and Liberation Theology PJ : What are the main points of convergence

In: Beijing International Review of Education

The seeds of liberation theology were sown on Latin American soil in the early 1960s. Young Catholic and Protestant theologians reflected on the people’s life of faith within the context of the people’s resistance to oppressive living and working conditions. Shortly after the birth of liberation

In: The Encyclopedia of Christianity Online

Introduction Subaltern liberation theology continues to present the most powerful challenge to the hegemony of Euro-American, patriarchal, and ruling-class theologies that use religious discourse to spawn and entrench new forms of political and socio-material domination. Those interested in

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

1. Liberation theology, or ‘the theology of liberation,’ is the first comprehensive theological movement within the Christian churches that has reacted to the social relations of the so-called Third World and sought to alter them with the help of the Christian faith—even in revolutionary activity

In: The Brill Dictionary of Religion Online

[German Version] I. Church History – II. Systematics a. The birth of liberation theology is usually dated to 1971, when Gutiérrez published his Teologia de la liberación, or 1968, the year of the second Latin American Catholic Bishops' Conference in Medellín, Colombia. The two events represented

In: Religion Past and Present Online

: ‘whatever his [Pope Francis] ambivalence about liberation theology in the past, his first Apostolic Exhortation . . . eloquently reveals his thinking today’. 1 We will focus on the theological content of the liberationist discourse and on Francis’ social theology as from Evangelii Gaudium ( eg ). At the

In: Exchange

environmental degradation that can deprive the poor of their livelihood. Th e Church, demonstrating the influence of liberation theology and its preferential option for the poor, has taken a stance opposing mining as an activ- ity that may harm the poor by degrading the environment upon which they depend for

In: Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology