The chapter focuses on the Lisbon cultural phenomenon of the traditional urban music, fado, with an emphasis on its amateur practice.1 It explains briefly the impact of Salazar’s fascist regime which entailed a radical change of status of a fadista artist who was abruptly separated from the original popular practice of fado and closed into a codified environment for professionals – casa de fado. But the popular fado remained preserved in different places in the city and sill has an important role in a local context of the Lisbon popular quarters. It interlaces social relations and its continuous presence strongly influences the configuration of local cultural patterns. Whereas typical casas de fado are focused on a broad public, the attractiveness of the places with amateur fado sessions lies in social intercourse. They can be found all around the city and they are not dependent on running fado sessions. One of those places is a neighbourhood recreation association. According to Portuguese sociologist António Firmino Costa, they entail one of the essential roles in the continuous recreation of fado as urban popular cultural practice. This research concentrates on amateur fado in the neighbourhood recreation association Mirantense Futebol Club in the neighbourhood of Santa Engrácia.

In: Hidden Cities: Understanding Urban Popcultures

[German Version] Lisbon, capital of Portugal, with a population of 565,000 (2001). The first known bishop of Lisbon was Potamius (357). With the Arab conquest in 719, it became a Mozarabic see. The Reconquista retook it in 1147. Under King Alfonso III (1248–1279), it rose to become the royal

In: Religion Past and Present Online
Author: Arturo Prats

Lisbon (Ar. al-Ushbūna; Port. Lisboa), today the capital city of Portugal, situated on the Atlantic coast at the mouth of the Tagus River, was in the earliest Islamic period part of the province of Beja, but later was part of a separate province with Santarem and Sintra. During the Muslim period

The Law and Practice of Facultative Mixity
Despite the Lisbon Treaty reforming the EU Treaty provisions on external relations, it was argued at the time of the Treaty’s entry into force that ‘mixity was here to stay’. While this has indeed proven to be the case, the Court of Justice’s jurisprudence has nonetheless redrawn the contours within which mixity can thrive and for the first time has confirmed the existence of ‘facultative mixity’. In light of these significant post-Lisbon developments the volume aims to clarify the law and policy of facultative mixed agreements in the EU’s treaty practice and this not only from the perspective of EU (constitutional) law itself but also from the perspective of the EU Member States’ legal systems, that of the EU’s third country treaty partners and that of public international law itself.
Author: Paul Nelles

transmission nodes such as Lisbon and Seville. The second factor was distance and the related problem of time. The frequency of communication followed a sliding scale, with colleges in closer proximity to Rome reporting more frequently than those further afield. The high frequencies of exchange initially

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
Culture, Diplomacy and Interactions
Editor: George C.X. Wei
The era of globalization has witnessed increasing activities across border and interactions between nations, especially between the East and the West. East and West: Culture, Diplomacy and Interactions aims to trace and investigate multiple-dimensional interactions between the East and the West from the Age of Sail to the Modern Era, culturally, socially, economically and diplomatically, with a focus on maritime history via and centered on port cities such as Macao, Goa, Melaka, Nagasaki in the East and their counterparts such as Lisbon, Seville, Amsterdam, London in the West. The series examines matters about empires, oceans, and human connections through changes in material lives and cultural politics, and analyzes the impact of the flow of cultural materials across oceans, such as artifacts, arts, goods, foods, books, knowledge, beliefs, etc., on port cities and urbanization. Particularly, it will provide readers with a new maritime vision of the East and Southeast Asian history of connections at the eastern end of the Maritime Silk Road, including the ports of East Indian Ocean and South China Sea: places from Nagasaki to Xiamen/Macao, from Singapore to Shanghai, from Hong Kong to Melbourne, etc. In doing so, it will unfold the process of formation and transformation of networks and fluxing space, generated or altered by trade, migrations, diplomacies, regional conglomerations, etc., illustrate the glocolization of religions, examine the relationship of culture/tradition and diplomatic strategy, and demonstrate the causes to miscommunication, misunderstanding, conflicts and confrontations between nations as well as appropriate reading, understanding and interpreting of each other.
East and West will include studies in such disciplines and area studies as maritime history, missionary history, intellectual history, international relations, arts, architecture, music, religious studies, and cultural studies. This series will feature monographs and edited volumes as well as translated works. It will be of interest to academics as well as general readers, including historians, artists, architects, diplomats, politicians, journalists, travelers, religious groups, businessmen, lawyers, among other groups.
Author: David G. Frier

1 Pierre Nora and his “lieux de mémoire” At a time when questions of physical representations of historical memory are being discussed across the globe, this paper will explore the Portuguese National Stadium, situated in the Jamor valley, on the western outskirts of Lisbon and constructed amidst

In: Lusotopie
Editor-in-Chief: Chaime Marcuello-Servós
We are living in turbulent times in which we need to face global challenges connecting fields and perspectives. Complex social issues require complex, multidisciplinary approaches to deal with their complexity. In recent decades, sociocybernetics has developed as a distinct discipline that aims to meet this challenge. Sociocybernetics is concerned with applying first and second order cybernetics, the systems sciences and complexity science in the social sciences. Brill Research Perspectives in Sociocybernetics and Complexity disseminates advances in sociocybernetics and consolidates existing research efforts, including theory and applications. Each issue addresses developments around a specific topic; thus, besides the audience interested in developments in sociocybernetics and the complexity sciences, each issue appeals to those in other disciplines who are engaged with a particular topic. The topics addressed range from foundational issues to applications in systems modelling, the arts, social interventions, environmental problems, social work and care, public policies, and urban design, at a local or global scale. Brill Research Perspectives in Sociocybernetics and Complexity is an invaluable resource for scholars, policymakers and practitioners wishing to learn about the latest developments in sociocybernetics, as well as a useful resource for teachers and those studying the social sciences and related disciplines.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.

 Click on title to see all prices

The Journal of Religion in Africa, founded in 1967 by Andrew Walls, is interested in all religious traditions and all their forms, in every part of Africa, and it is open to every methodology. Its contributors include scholars working in history, anthropology, sociology, political science, missiology, literature and related disciplines. It occasionally publishes religious texts in their original African language.

Presenting a unique forum for the debate of theoretical issues in the analysis of African religion past and present, the Journal of Religion in Africa also encourages the development of new methodologies. It reviews a very wide range of books and regularly publishes longer review articles on works of special interest. It prides itself on being highly international and is the only English-language journal dedicated to the study of religion and ritual throughout Africa. In an effort to highlight emerging themes in the study of religion in Africa, and promote the outstanding work of younger scholars, it regularly publishes special issues on current topics.

European Science Foundation Ranking A.

NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in the Journal of Religion in Africa can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

 Click on title to see all prices

The Journal of World Literature (JWL) aspires to bring together scholars interested in developing the concept of World Literature, and to provide the most suitable environment for contributions from all the world’s literary traditions. It creates a forum for re-visiting global literary heritages, discovering valuable works that have been undeservedly ignored, and introducing aspects of the transnational global dissemination of literature, with translation as a focus. The journal welcomes submissions that can concurrently imagine any literary tradition, in any language, moving beyond national frames to simultaneously discuss and develop the cosmopolitan threads of a variety of literary traditions. It also welcomes contributions from scholars of different research backgrounds working collaboratively as well as from group research projects interested in showcasing their findings, in order to meet the challenge of a wider and deeper discussion of literature’s networks.

The editorial board of the JWL has begun accepting submissions for open-call issues.

The introductions of the issues of the first two years are available Open Access to familarize yourself with JWL and its applied scope.

 Click on title to see all prices