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. However, rather than obtaining information by observing another individual’s behaviour, as in public information use, social eavesdropping provides an individual with information about another individual’s quality by observing a signal exchange between two or more individuals. Mate choice copying is a

In: Behaviour

Mate-choice copying in free-ranging Trinidadian guppies ( Poecilia reticulata ) Jean-Guy J. Godin ∗ ) & Kimberley P.E. Hair (Department of Biology, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1S 5B6) (Accepted: 5 April 2009) Summary The social experiences of individuals can influence their mate

In: Behaviour
Author: Robert Brooks

MATE CHOICE COPYING IN GUPPIES: FEMALES AVOID THE PLACE WHERE THEY SAW COURTSHIP by ROBERT BROOKS 1,2) (Department of Zoology and Tropical Ecology, School of Tropical Biology, James Cook University of North Queensland, Townsville, 4811, Queensland, Australia) (Acc. 5-II-1999) Summary Recent

In: Behaviour

which mating decisions are being made. Keywords : mate preference, communication networks, sperm competition, mate competition, mate choice copying. Introduction An increasing body of literature considers the question of how environmen- tal constraints (like resource availability, presence of predators

In: Behaviour

–male interactions (e.g., Otter et al., 1999; Doutrelant & McGregor, 2000; Mennill et al., 2003). Numerous studies have shown that individuals may also alter their mate choice decisions after they had seen other members of their own sex sexually interact with a potential mating partner (mate choice copying: e

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species. Because the male’s genes are not incorporated into the offspring of Amazon mollies, males obtain no direct genetic benefits from mating with gynogens (but see Schlupp et al., 1994 for indirect benefits of mate choice copying). Previous research indicates that there are significant costs to males

In: Behaviour

-298. Berthold, P. (1992). Rapid microevolution of migratory behaviour in a wild bird species. — Nature 360: 668-669. Bradbury, J.W. & Vehrencamp, S.L. (1998). Principles of animal communication. — Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA. Briggs, S.E., Godin, J.-G.J. & Dugatkin, L.A. (1996). Mate-choice copying under

In: Behaviour

favours using public information for mate choice; a similar an explanation has been adduced to explain the evolution of male mate choice copying (Witte et al., 2015 ). Acknowledgements The office of the Vice Provost for Research, the Department of Biological Sciences at The University of Memphis and

In: Behaviour

attempting or successfully copulating with females, distant females can assess which males are most active by listening to the occur- rence of copulation vocalizations. Females could then favor those popular males through mate-choice copying (Dugatkin, 1992; Pruett-Jones, 1992; Yorzinski & Platt, 2010

In: Behaviour

benefits (Magurran & Nowak, 1991; Griffiths & Magurran, 1998; Croft et al., 2004; but see Ruhl & McRobert, 2005), such as a decrease in male harassment (Heubel & Plath, 2008) and a facilitation of mate-choice copying (Schlupp et al., 1994; Hill & Ryan, 2006; Heubel et al., 2008). Amazon mollies are known

In: Behaviour