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compositions of any length dealing with epic, romantic, ethical or didactic themes are of the mat̲h̲nawī form, which probably originated in Persia. Dawlats̲h̲āh (ed. E. G. Browne, p. 29) relates a tradition that in the time of the Dailamite ʿAḍud al-Dawla (d. 372 = 982) there was still to be found inscribed on

in Encyclopaedia of Islam First Edition Online

mat̲h̲nawī (A, P, T, U) : in literature, a poem written in rhyming couplets. In Arabic such a poem is called Muzdawid̲j̲. The single characteristic which separates the ~ from all other classical verse forms is its rhyming scheme aa bb cc , etc. Otherwise, the name

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dealing with epic, romantic, ethical or didactic themes are of the mat̲h̲nawī form, which probably originated in Persia. Dawlats̲h̲āh (ed. E. G. Browne, p. 29) relates a tradition that in the time of the Dailamite ʿAḍud al-Dawla (d. 372 = 982) there was still to be found inscribed on the palace at Ḳaṣr

refers to “a poem based on independent, internally rhyming lines ( abyāt-i mustaḳill-i muṣarraʿ ). The Persians call it mat̲h̲nawī because each line requires two rhyming letters— This kind

in Encyclopaedia of Islam New Edition Online (EI-2 English)

vers indépendants, à rime interne ( abyāt-i mustaḳill-i muṣarraʿ ). Les Persans l’appellent mat̲h̲nawī parce que chaque vers exige deux lettres à la rime [...]. Cette forme ( nawʿ ) est employée dans les narrations étendues et les histoires longues qui peuvent difficilement être traitées dans des

in Encyclopédie de l'Islam en ligne (EI-2 French)

1 Introduction The pause in the composition of Mathnawī after Book One, along with the opening lines of Book Two where Rūmī explains the reason for the pause, has been the subject of extensive scholarly debate. Rūmī’s richly allusive style and polysemous use of metaphor, combined with

In: Journal of Sufi Studies
mujallad-i avval daftar-i avval u duvum
The founder of the Mawlawiyya order of dervishes, Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī (d. 672/1273) is the most celebrated and widely quoted mystical poet of the Persianate world. Born in Balkh in 604/1207, he was still a child when his father, a preacher, emigrated westwards with his family, moving to Malaṭya, Sivas, Akshehir, Larende and, finally, Konya. It was in Konya that Rūmī, who had also received a regular education, met the people who would give his life a decisive turn towards mysticism: first, his father’s former pupil Sayyid Burhān al-Dīn Muḥaqqiq (d. 637/1239-40) and then, most of all, the celebrated mystic Shams al-Dīn Tabrīzī (d. 645/1247). Rūmī’s Mathnawi-yi maʿnawī is a didactic poem inspired by his favourite student Ḥusām al-Dīn Čelebi (d. 683/1284). Composed in six fascicles (daftar), it took several years to complete. The edition printed here is an enhanced version of the one by Nicholson, with Nicholson’s introductory essays and notes translated into Persian. 4 vols; volume 1.
mujallad-i chahārum kashf al-abyāt va namāyahā
The founder of the Mawlawiyya order of dervishes, Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī (d. 672/1273) is the most celebrated and widely quoted mystical poet of the Persianate world. Born in Balkh in 604/1207, he was still a child when his father, a preacher, emigrated westwards with his family, moving to Malaṭya, Sivas, Akshehir, Larende and, finally, Konya. It was in Konya that Rūmī, who had also received a regular education, met the people who would give his life a decisive turn towards mysticism: first, his father’s former pupil Sayyid Burhān al-Dīn Muḥaqqiq (d. 637/1239-40) and then, most of all, the celebrated mystic Shams al-Dīn Tabrīzī (d. 645/1247). Rūmī’s Mathnawi-yi maʿnawī is a didactic poem inspired by his favourite student Ḥusām al-Dīn Čelebi (d. 683/1284). Composed in six fascicles (daftar), it took several years to complete. The edition printed here is an enhanced version of the one by Nicholson, with Nicholson’s introductory essays and notes translated into Persian. 4 vols; volume 4.
mujallad-i duvum daftar-i sivum u chahārum
The founder of the Mawlawiyya order of dervishes, Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī (d. 672/1273) is the most celebrated and widely quoted mystical poet of the Persianate world. Born in Balkh in 604/1207, he was still a child when his father, a preacher, emigrated westwards with his family, moving to Malaṭya, Sivas, Akshehir, Larende and, finally, Konya. It was in Konya that Rūmī, who had also received a regular education, met the people who would give his life a decisive turn towards mysticism: first, his father’s former pupil Sayyid Burhān al-Dīn Muḥaqqiq (d. 637/1239-40) and then, most of all, the celebrated mystic Shams al-Dīn Tabrīzī (d. 645/1247). Rūmī’s Mathnawi-yi maʿnawī is a didactic poem inspired by his favourite student Ḥusām al-Dīn Čelebi (d. 683/1284). Composed in six fascicles (daftar), it took several years to complete. The edition printed here is an enhanced version of the one by Nicholson, with Nicholson’s introductory essays and notes translated into Persian. 4 vols; volume 2.
mujallad-i sivum daftar-i panjum u shishum
The founder of the Mawlawiyya order of dervishes, Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī (d. 672/1273) is the most celebrated and widely quoted mystical poet of the Persianate world. Born in Balkh in 604/1207, he was still a child when his father, a preacher, emigrated westwards with his family, moving to Malaṭya, Sivas, Akshehir, Larende and, finally, Konya. It was in Konya that Rūmī, who had also received a regular education, met the people who would give his life a decisive turn towards mysticism: first, his father’s former pupil Sayyid Burhān al-Dīn Muḥaqqiq (d. 637/1239-40) and then, most of all, the celebrated mystic Shams al-Dīn Tabrīzī (d. 645/1247). Rūmī’s Mathnawi-yi maʿnawī is a didactic poem inspired by his favourite student Ḥusām al-Dīn Čelebi (d. 683/1284). Composed in six fascicles (daftar), it took several years to complete. The edition printed here is an enhanced version of the one by Nicholson, with Nicholson’s introductory essays and notes translated into Persian. 4 vols; volume 3.