incomplete Sanskrit inscription found in the south gate of the Jami Masjid at Jaunpur has traditionally been ascribed to the Maukhari king of Kanauj ¯ I ´ svaravar- man (first half of 6th century). Collation of this inscription with another Maukhari inscription (the Haraha Stone Inscription of ¯ I

In: Indo-Iranian Journal
In: The World of the Skandapurāṇa

of the sixth or early seventh century. It follows that the otherwise completely unknown Mahāsāmanta Udayasena was a feudatory, not of Harṣavardhana, but of the Maukharis, and most likely ruled under Avantivarman, the last of the great Maukhari kings of Kanauj, whose reign spanned the final decades of

In: Indo-Iranian Journal
The World of the Skandapurāṇa explores the historical, religious and literary environment that gave rise to the composition and spread of this early Purana text devoted to Siva. It is argued that the text originated in circles of Pasupata ascetics and laymen, probably in Benares, in the second half of the 6th and first half of he 7th centuries. The book describes the political developments in Northern India after the fall of the Gupta Empire until the successor states which arose after the death of king Harsavardhana of Kanauj in the second half of the 7th century. The work consists of two parts. In the first part the historical environment in which this Purāṇa was composed is described. The second part explores six localities in Northern India that play a prominent role in the text. It is richly illustrated and contains a detailed bibliography and index.


- chronized with and was also partly the result of the incursions and i,nfiltrations of the Hunas, Gurjaras, Culikas or Calukyas and other Asian peoples and the rise of new ruling dynasties, like the Later Guptas of East Malava, the Vardhanas of West Malava, the Maukharis of Magadha and later the Puspabhutis

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

36 & 9) provides for the collection of the share of produce, taxes, fines etc. by the saman- tas (estate-owners) and not by the "king" or ruler of the country.5) The first epigraphic mention of the term sdmanta in the sense of a feudatory is found in the Barabar Hill Cave Inscription of the Maukhari

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

) the economic centre of gravity seems to have lain in the eastern part of the Ganges Valley (Gauda) but the key strategic area was the western part (centring on the fortress city of Kanyakubja) : the permanent political problem for the later Guptas and the Palas, or for the Maukharis and Pusyabha- tis

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

, K. P. Nautiyal & M. K. Nautiyal, ‘Himalayan Expeditions of the Maukharis vis-à-vis H ¯ un . a Invasion’, pp. 109–115; K. L. Agrawal, ‘Gop¯ala: The Saviour of K¯ırttivarman Chandella’, pp. 116–120; Shrinivas Ritti, ‘Jagad- deva Episode in Ch¯alukya History’, pp. 121–123; Brahmanand Deshpande, ‘The

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

a chance of asserting their independence. One of them, t h e Maukhari clan, obtained sovereignty over a kingdom in North India, including also, it would seem, A y o d h y L Under their rule the capital of the kingdom was transferred to Kanauj (C.H.I. III, p. 69 f.). 37 Ayodhya of these days is thus

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

be safely considered as two hitherto unknown members of the Maukhari clan." The question will have to be deferred until the inscription is published, which to my knowledge has not yet occurred. 20 Thus for example the appearance of the names Ya~ovardhana and Visnuvar,dhana (father and son) in the

In: Indo-Iranian Journal