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© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/156851511X575604 Biblical Interpretation 19 (2011) 253-275 brill.nl/bi Biblical Interpretation orn Metamorphosis, Transfiguration, and the Body George Aichele a) and Richard Walsh b) a) Adrian College, Adrian, Michigan gcaichele@comcast.net b

In: Biblical Interpretation
Transformations of the Body and the Influence of Ovid’s Metamorphoses on Germanic Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
Author: David Gallagher
The origins of selected instances of metamorphosis in Germanic literature are traced from their roots in Ovid’s Metamorphoses, grouped roughly on an ‘ascending evolutionary scale’ (invertebrates, birds, animals, and mermaids). Whilst a broad range of mythological, legendary, fairytale and folktale traditions have played an appreciable part, Ovid’s Metamorphoses is still an important comparative analysis and reference point for nineteenth- and twentieth-century German-language narratives of transformations. Metamorphosis is most often used as an index of crisis: an existential crisis of the subject or a crisis in a society’s moral, social or cultural values. Specifically selected texts for analysis include Jeremias Gotthelf’s Die schwarze Spinne (1842) with the terrifying metamorphoses of Christine into a black spider, the metamorphosis of Gregor Samsa in Kafka’s Die Verwandlung (1915), ambiguous metamorphoses in E. T. A. Hoffmann’s Der goldne Topf (1814), Hermann Hesse’s Piktors Verwandlungen (1925), Der Steppenwolf (1927) and Christoph Ransmayr’s Die letzte Welt (1988). Other mythical metamorphoses are examined in texts by Bachmann, Fouqué, Fontane, Goethe, Nietzsche, Nelly Sachs, Thomas Mann and Wagner, and these and many others confirm that metamorphosis is used historically, scientifically, for religious purposes; to highlight identity, sexuality, a dream state, or for metaphoric, metonymic or allegorical reasons.

Amphibia-Reptilia 31 (2010): 425-434 Effect of habitat drying on the development of the Eastern spadefoot toad ( Pelobates syriacus ) tadpoles Paul Székely 1 ,* , Marian Tudor 2 , Dan Cog ˘ alniceanu 2 Abstract. Amphibians exhibit plasticity in the timing of metamorphosis, and tadpoles of many

In: Amphibia-Reptilia

size at metamorphosis in animals with complex life cycles such as anuran amphibians, has long been of interest to ecologists. For different studies on life history plasticity to be comparable, there must be clearly defined and commonly agreed transition points, but it is unclear how consistently this

In: Amphibia-Reptilia
Fictional Representations of the Becoming Human
Author: D.B.D. Asker
Aspects of Metamorphosis: Fictional Representations of the Becoming Human explores the various forms of metamorphosis found in literature – mostly modern fiction but informed by earlier examples – and the premises upon which the literature of transformation may be said to depend. Instances of metamorphosis are very widespread in modern literature but as yet there has been no attempt to describe this literary-anthropological phenomenon from a larger perspective. This study approaches such a task. The focus of Aspects of Metamorphosis is on human-animal fictional metamorphoses which embody the concept of becoming-human. Gilles Deleuze describes metamorphosis (especially in Kafka) as the becoming-animal. Across the wide range of examples of literary metamorphosis in different languages and cultures, I describe the becoming-animal as an aspect of the becoming human, a radical approach to mankind’s perception of itself, and restoration to itself, through an animal other. Franz Kafka is in many ways an odd man out in the crowd of modern metamorphosists. Other authors across borders, political, geographical and linguistic, present a humanist and moralist perspective that does not represent a fundamental break with the norms and cultural traditions rooted in the past.