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Author: Kishan Rana

outreach, networking, consular diplomacy, migration, mobilizing support * ) My experience with the Indian diaspora during diff erent assignments refl ects how policy and attitudes have evolved. In Hong Kong as a Chinese-language trainee (1961-1963), my two heads of post handled interaction with a 15

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
Author: Eric Keels

civil wars as a way to mobilize support from disaffected communities. To that end, the political apparatus of insurgencies often aggregate civilian grievances and formulate them into policy demands. These policy positions therefore inform the types of concessions insurgents are willing to accept in

In: International Negotiation

interaction between religion and politics in Zimbabwe has not lacked debate. From the liberation struggle of the 1960s to the present, politicians have always deployed religious rhetoric to mobilise support. However, Chamisa took this to an unprecedented level by explicitly blurring the boundaries between his

In: Exchange
Author: Chris Miller

economic policy. Via formal and informal exchanges, new ideas from other countries played a major role in Soviet thinking. And Soviet economists cleverly used foreign ideas to legitimize and mobilize support for new policies that they were advocating. From planning to taxation, from enterprise reform to

In: The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review
Author: Thomas Devaney

responses to representations of Islam and promises of heavenly rewards. But how did one mobilize support for a holy war among a population that had mixed views of the religious enemy, or when that populace comprised multiple confessional groups? Such conditions prevailed in the many medieval frontier

In: Medieval Encounters

Abstract

This article takes as its starting point recent efforts by the Korean Constitutional Court to mobilise support for the establishment of a regional rights system in Asia that is envisaged to include an Asian human rights court, akin to the design of similar systems in other parts of the world. It explains why dialogic relations between such a court and national apex courts in the would-be Contracting States are instrumental for the success of a regional rights mechanism. The article further identifies strategies that should be pursued to fashion a framework that would allow such dialogic relations to flourish. With several of these requiring institutionalisation, it is important that as and when Asian States become more congenial to the idea of an external rights monitoring system, the issue of inter-court relations is duly considered at the drafting stage. 


In: The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law

Abstract

This article takes as its starting point recent efforts by the Korean Constitutional Court to mobilise support for the establishment of a regional rights system in Asia that is envisaged to include an Asian human rights court, akin to the design of similar systems in other parts of the world. It explains why dialogic relations between such a court and national apex courts in the would-be Contracting States are instrumental for the success of a regional rights mechanism. The article further identifies strategies that should be pursued to fashion a framework that would allow such dialogic relations to flourish. With several of these requiring institutionalisation, it is important that as and when Asian States become more congenial to the idea of an external rights monitoring system, the issue of inter-court relations is duly considered at the drafting stage. 


In: The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law

Since January 2009, the members of the Sri Lankan Tamil diaspora have staged several protests around the world in a concentrated effort to bring attention to the ethnic conflict that has been ravaging the island of Sri Lanka for over two decades. Although the members of this diaspora are dispersed around the globe, Canada, particularly Toronto, is believed to be the home of the largest Sri Lankan Tamil population outside of Sri Lanka—a diaspora that is estimated to have a population of over 200,000 people. The participation of this diaspora in the multiple protests that have been held in Toronto has ranged from hundreds to tens of thousands. These protests used the frame of ‘genocide’ in order to mobilise support and resources from both the Sri Lankan Tamil diaspora in Toronto, as well as the wider community. However, despite the use of a ‘genocide’ frame, the make-up of these demonstrations revealed a substantial proportion of the participants protesting for a separate Tamil State (Tamil Eelam), and demanding that the Canadian government lift the ban on the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam that proclaims them to be a terrorist organisation. This chapter explores how protests that had utilised such a strong frame to mobilise support was able to transform into protests that were also focused on secession. It is argued that when members of the Sri Lankan Tamil diaspora united in protest, the frame of genocide acted as a hook that triggered the mass recollection of the narrative of their Sri Lankan collective cultural identity. The chapter explores this narrative and the extent to which it is conveyed to the greater population by using newspaper articles and websites that covered the protests that occurred on January 30, 2009, March 16, 2009, and April 27, 2009.

In: Diasporas: Revisiting and Discovering

http://concernedafricascholars.org/ Founded: 1977 Mission/Objectives: Dedicated to formulating alternative analyses of Africa and US government policy, developing communication and action networks between the peoples and scholars of Africa and those in the USA, and mobilizing support in the United

In: African Studies Companion Online
Author: Mohammed Hatimi

Marocain, a small Jewish group connected to the nationalist Istiqlal Party that sought to mobilize support for the Moroccan nationalist cause. In 1956, the year Morocco attained independence, he co-founded th...