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Carolyn J. Pouncy

Making of the Muscovite Political System, 1345–1547 , historians of Muscovy have become increasingly comfortable with the idea that political power in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Russia depended on a combination of kinship ties and proximity to the grand prince (after 1547, tsar). 1 Although on

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Three “Hands” and Literacy in Muscovy during the Reign of Ivan IV

“I Affix My Hand,” “By My Own Hand,” and “My Man’s Hand”

Charles J. Halperin

Opinions vary about the extent of literacy in Muscovy during the reign of Ivan  IV (Ivan the Terrible, 1533–1584), in part because historians disagree on the criteria for determining literacy. Until fairly recently, the division of opinion fell along national lines. Some historians assert that

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Bulat R. Rakhimzianov

” should be expanded, to include also a political meaning. Political exchange, as we will see, is easier if the place of exchange is situated within a geographical frontier zone. The requirement here is that members of different cultures participate in the process. Tatar enclaves of Muscovy facilitated

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Alexander Filyushkin

inostrannoi presse v Rossii  XVII stoletiia,” Drenviaia Rus’. Voprosy medievistiki 2 (2007): 42–47. 28 Shamin, “K voprosu,” 50, 52–53. 29 See Robert O. Crummey, “The Silence of Muscovy,” Russian Review 46, no. 2 (1987): 157–164; Valerie Kivelson, “Muscovite ‘Citizenship:’ Rights without Freedom

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Isaiah Gruber

observations, I proposed to investigate the process whereby Muscovy’s own unique matrix of transmuted biblical concepts came to be formed; to define that system vis-à-vis the “original” semantic field or set of meanings evident in ancient Hebrew (and Greek); and to compare it to other contemporary

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A.L. Korzinin and V.V. Shishkin

Duma in the Reign of Ivan  III ,” Slavonic and East European Review 104 (1967): 76–123; idem, “Aristocratic Politics and Royal Policy in Muscovy in the Late Fifteenth and Early Sixteenth Centuries,” Forschungen zur osteuropaischen Geschichte 27 (1980): 77–109; idem, “The Origins of Moscovite

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Murat Yaşar

The present paper explores the hitherto unknown beginnings of the Ottoman-Russian imperial rivalry by focusing on the mid-16th-century encounter between the Ottoman Empire and the Tsardom of Muscovy over the North Caucasus, where the ambitions of these two asymmetric powers—the Ottomans being an established “super power” and the Muscovites a rising power—became entangled for the first time. This first encounter, which was the harbinger of many future engagements not only in this region but also in the broader steppe frontier around the Black Sea, was more of a “cold war” rather than a military confrontation, as both the Ottomans and the Muscovites rather preferred to establish spheres of influence and eventually their hegemony over the North Caucasus through their vassals and clients. In addition to demonstrating the Tsardom of Muscovy’s initial claims and policies over the North Caucasus, this study will shed light on the reasons of the Ottoman failure to transform their nominal claims over the region to a de facto hegemony similar to what they had established over Eastern European principalities.

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Simon Franklin

mismatch between the patterns of the spread of print culture in Russia and in Western Europe: the fact that knowledge of, and availability of, the technology of print did not spark an equivalent “print revolution” in Muscovy. While historians of print culture in Western Europe have an ample agenda merely

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Brian Davies

common further east in Europe. In the early 1630s the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and Muscovy raced against each other to raise “foreign formation” ( cudzozimski autorament or inozemskii stroi ) regiments recruited abroad by military enterprisers, built around foreign mercenary cores and officered

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Kati Parppei

half of the 16 th century a new tone was introduced in representations of the battle. By then Muscovy had already gained a dominant position amongst the principalities of Rus’, Ivan III (1462–1505) and Vasilii III (1505–1533) having determinedly aimed at unifying the Orthodox lands with Russian