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Author: Frank Lewis

Parmenides’ Modal Fallacy Frank A. Lewis University of Southern California, School of Philosophy, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0451, USA fl ewis@usc.edu Abstract In his great poem, Parmenides uses an argument by elimination to select the correct “way of inquiry” from a pool of two, the ways of is and

In: Phronesis
Author: Figal, Günter

[German Version] (probably not before 510 – after 450 bce). Alongside Heraclitus, Parmenides was the most important thinker before Socrates and Plato. Nothing is known of his life apart from his birthplace, Elea in southern Italy. By contrast, his philosophy is well attested; the poem in hexameters

In: Religion Past and Present Online
The Divine Revelation on Being, Thinking, and the Doxa
Author: Meijer
One of the main problems in the the study of Parmenides’ poem is establishing the meaning of e‰nai, ‘to be’. Scholars often simply take it to mean: ‘to exist’, ‘to be the case’, ‘to be so’, or regard it as a copula. It’s better to start by fathoming what Parmenides himself has to say about to be and about Being. This cannot be done without recognizing the logical pattern in his poem. Another main problem is: what does not-Being mean? Is the so-called Doxa - as not-Being - a non-existing, hallucinatory world, an illusion, a fata morgana? Or is it only a detector of lies? In the present work the view will be advocated that the Doxa offers the description of a really existing world. A specific merit of this book is that all the problems involved will be examined in continuous debate with what scholars have offered as solutions so far.

(Παρμενίδης; Parmeníd ēs). [German version] P. from Elea, philosopher of the late 6th and early 5th cent. BC, akmḗ c. 500 BC (28 A 1 DK), key figure of the Eleatic School. Plato's dialogue Parmenides (127a = 28 A 11 DK) represents a fictitious meeting between P., aged c. 65,  Zeno [1] of Elea, c

In: Brill's New Pauly Online
Author: George Kerferd

227 CRITICAL NOTICE Parménide GEORGE KERFERD Bertrand Russell once said that what makes Parmenides historically important is that he invented a form of metaphysical argument that, in one form or another, is to be found in most subsequent metaphysicians down to and in- cluding Hegel (History of

In: Phronesis
Authors: John E. Sisko and Yale Weiss

1 Introduction In the contemporary debate over Parmenides, three core perspectives stand at issue. Some scholars (the overwhelming majority) contend that Parmenides is a numerical monist, embracing a token monism of things; 1 others claim that he is a predicational monist, promoting a type

In: Phronesis
Volume 1: History and Interpretation from the Old Academy to Later Platonism and Gnosticism
"Plato’s Parmenides and Its Heritage" presents in two volumes ground-breaking results in the history of interpretation of Plato’s Parmenides, the culmination of six years of international collaboration by the SBL Annual Meeting seminar, “Rethinking Plato’s Parmenides and Its Platonic, Gnostic and Patristic Reception” (2001–2007).

The theme of Volume 1 is the dissolution of firm boundaries for thinking about the tradition of Parmenides interpretation from the Old Academy through Middle Platonism and Gnosticism. The volume suggests a radically different interpretation of the history of thought from Plato to Proclus than is customary by arguing against Proclus’s generally accepted view that there was no metaphysical interpretation of the Parmenides before Plotinus in the third century C.E. Instead, this volume traces such metaphysical interpretations, first, to Speusippus and the early Platonic Academy; second, to the Platonism of the first and second centuries C.E. in figures like Moderatus and Numenius; third, to the emergence of an exegetical tradition that read Aristotle’s categories in relation to the Parmenides; and, fourth, to important Middle Platonic figures and texts. The contributors to Volume 1 are Kevin Corrigan, Gerald Bechtle, Luc Brisson, John Dillon, Thomas Szlezák, Zlatko Pleše, Noel Hubler, John D. Turner, Johanna Brankaer, Volker Henning Drecoll, and Alain Lernould.
Volume 2: Reception in Patristic, Gnostic, and Christian Neoplatonic Texts
"Plato’s Parmenides and Its Heritage" presents in two volumes ground-breaking results in the history of interpretation of Plato’s Parmenides, the culmination of six years of international collaboration by the SBL Annual Meeting seminar, “Rethinking Plato’s Parmenides and Its Platonic, Gnostic and Patristic Reception” (2001–2007).

Volume 2 examines and establishes for the first time evidence for a significant knowledge of the Parmenides in Philo, Clement, and patristic sources. It offers an extensive and balanced analysis of the case for and against the various possible attributions of date and authorship of the Anonymous Commentary in relation to Gnosticism, Middle Platonism, and Neoplatonism and argues that on balance the case for a pre-Plotinian authorship is warranted. It also undertakes for the first time in this form an examination of the Parmenides in relation to Jewish and Christian thought, moving from Philo and Clement through Origen and the Cappadocians to Pseudo-Dionysius. The contributors to Volume 2 are Matthias Vorwerk, Kevin Corrigan, Luc Brisson, Volker Henning Drecoll, Tuomas Rasimus, John F. Finamore, John M. Dillon, Sara Ahbel-Rappe, Gerald Bechtle, David T. Runia, Mark Edwards, Jean Reynard, and Andrew Radde-Gallwitz.
Author: Lloyd P. Gerson

I begin with the sweeping pronouncement made by the distinguished scholar Jean Trouillard: ‘Neoplatonism succeeded Middle Platonism the day that Platonists decided to seek in Parmenides the secret to Plato’s philosophy. That moment seems to have occurred with Plotinus’s theory of three “ones”.’ 1

In: The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition
Author: Rose Cherubin

. I would submit that Parmenides did it before him. Parmenides did not refer to a search for wisdom or for first causes, but he did explore something closely related. His poem poses the question of how to speak and conceive of what-is 2 in a way that accords with (and does not also conflict with

In: Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy