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Association preferences of unisexual Amazon mollies ( Poecilia formosa ): differential response to swords based on sex of the bisexual parental species Jennifer M. Gumm 1,2,4) & Maria Thaker 1,3,5) ( 1 Department of Biology, Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, TX 78666, USA; 2

In: Behaviour

PSEUDOMALE BEHAVIOUR AND SPONTANEOUS MASCULINIZATION IN THE ALL-FEMALE TELEOST POECILIA FORMOSA (TELEOSTEI: POECILIIDAE) by INGO SCHLUPP1,5), JAKOB PARZEFALL1), JÖRG T. EPPLEN2), INDRAJIT NANDA3), MICHAEL SCHMID3) and MANFRED SCHARTL4,6,7,8) (1Zoologisches Institut und Zoologisches Museum der

In: Behaviour

Behaviour 149 (2012) 233–249 brill.nl/beh Mating preferences of Amazon mollies ( Poecilia formosa ) in multi-host populations Brandon L. Joachim ∗ and Ingo Schlupp Department of Zoology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA * Corresponding author’s e-mail address: brandon

In: Behaviour

Geographic variation in female mate-copying in the species complex of a unisexual fish, Poecilia formosa Katja U. Heubel 1,2,3) , Katja Hornhardt 1) , Tanja Ollmann 1) , Jakob Parzefall 1) , Michael J. Ryan 2) & Ingo Schlupp 1,2,4) ( 1 Universität Hamburg, Biozentrum Grindel, Hamburg, Germany

In: Behaviour

continued maintenance of Amazon mollies. Keywords : gynogenesis, mate choice, Poecilia formosa , Poecilia latipinna , predation risk. Introduction Predation risk can affect time spent searching for mates, evaluating and courting potential mates, and copulating (Magnhagen, 1991; Sih, 1994). As such, there

In: Behaviour

latipinna , Poecilia mexicana , Poecilia formosa . Introduction The temporal sequence of the evolution of preferences and traits is almost always unknown. Both trait and preference can evolve simultaneously or either trait or preference can evolve Ž rst and then come under sexual 3) Corresponding author; e

In: Behaviour

cost on females. Keywords : sexual harassment, Poecilia , gynogenesis, unisexual, Poecilia latipinna , Poecilia formosa , guppy. Introduction In many mating systems males use coercion to inseminate females. Male coercion can be costly for females, due to: death of the female ( e.g. Reale et al. , 1996

In: Behaviour

Poecilia formosa uses sperm of Poecilia latipinna or P. mexicana for its gynogenetic reproduction. Normally, P. formosa lives in sympatry with only one of these species. Near Tampico, Mexico, one population of P. formosa is living in sympatry with both sperm-donor species. In the present study, using

In: Behaviour

, Poecilia formosa , unisexual vertebrates, sperm dependence. 1. Introduction Species recognition and mate quality recognition are the two main processes involved in mate choice (Ryan & Rand, 1993). However, these processes © 2012 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden DOI:10.1163/1568539X-00003007 870

In: Behaviour

al., 2014). In the present study, we use the gynogenetic Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa , which shows several of the above mentioned properties: they can distinguish between different clonal lineages, multiple clonal lineages occur in an overlapping social environment, they have limited dispersal

In: Behaviour