Search Results

Author: Jeremy Barrier

Biblical Interpretation 16 (2008) 336-362 www.brill.nl/bi Biblical Interpretation orn © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/156851508X329656 Marks of Oppression: A Postcolonial Reading of Paul’s Stigmata in Galatians 6: 7 Jeremy W. Barrier Heritage Christian University Abstract In

In: Biblical Interpretation
Author: Mykola Ryabchuk

also appreciate the fi nal round of copy-editing by Marta D. Olynyk. 1) Ludovic Kennedy, In Bed with an Elephant (London: Corgi Books, 1996), p. viii. Th e Ukrainian “Friday” and the Russian “Robinson”: Th e Uneasy Advent of Postcoloniality * Mykola Ryabchuk Ukrainian Center for Cultural Studies, Kyiv

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies
Author: Joerg Rieger

Theology and Mission Between Neocolonialism and Postcolonialism J OERG R IEGER ∗ ABSTRACT In this article Joerg Rieger writes about the historical connection between colonialism and mission, and the connection between neocolonialism and mission in the present situation of globalization

In: Mission Studies

brill.nl/mjcc MEJCC Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication 3 (2010) 289–311 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI 10.1163/187398610X538669 Th e Postcolonial in Motion: Hijra ila ardi al-ahlam and the Construction of Postcolonial Counterdiscourse Lhoussain Simour * Sidi Mohamed Ben

In: Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication
Recent crime fiction increasingly transcends national boundaries, with investigators operating across countries and continents. Frequently, the detective is a migrant or comes from a transcultural background. To solve the crime, the investigator is called upon to decipher the meaning(s) hidden in clues and testimonies that require transcultural forms of understanding. For the reader, the investigation discloses new interpretive methods and processes of social investigation, often challenging facile interpretations of the postcolonial world order.
Under the rubric 'postcolonial postmortems', this collection of essays seeks to explore the tropes, issues and themes that characterise this emergent form of crime fiction. But what does the 'postcolonial' bring to the genre apart from the well-known, and valid, discourses of resistance, subversion and ethnicity? And why 'postmortems'? A dissection and medical examination of a body to determine the cause of death, the 'postmortem' of the postcolonial not only alludes to the investigation of the victim's remains, but also to the body of the individual text and its contexts.
This collection interrogates literary concepts of postcoloniality and crime from transcultural perspectives in the attempt to offer new critical impulses to the study of crime fiction and postcolonial literatures. International scholars offer insights into the 'postcolonial postmortems' of a wide range of texts by authors from Africa, South Asia, the Asian and African Diaspora, and Australia, including Robert G. Barrett, Unity Dow, Wessel Ebersohn, Romesh Gunesekera, Kazuo Ishiguro, Sujata Massey, Alexander McCall Smith and Michael Ondaatje.
Cultural Representation and Critical Spatial Thinking
The sites from which postcolonial cultural articulations develop and the sites at which they are received have undergone profound transformations within the last decades. This book traces the accelerating emergence of cultural crossovers and overlaps in a global perspective and through a variety of disciplinary approaches. It starts from the premise that after the ‘spatial turn’ human action and cultural representations can no longer be grasped as firmly located in or clearly demarcated by territorial entities. The collection of essays investigates postcolonial articulations of various genres and media in their spatiality and locatedness while envisaging acts of location as dynamic cultural processes. It explores the ways in which critical spatial thinking can be made productive: Testing the uses and limitations of ‘translocation’ as an open exploratory model for a critically spatialized postcolonial studies, it covers a wide range of cultural expressions from the anglophone world and beyond – literature, film, TV, photography and other forms of visual art, philosophy, historical memory, and tourism.
The extensive introductory chapter charts various facets of spatial thinking from a variety of disciplines, and critically discusses their implications for postcolonial studies. The contributors’ essays range from theoretical interventions into the critical routines of postcolonial criticism to case studies of specific cultural texts, objects, and events reflecting temporal and spatial, material and intellectual, physical and spiritual mobility. What emerges is a fascinating survey of the multiple directions postcolonial translocations can take in the future.
This book is aimed at students and scholars of postcolonial literary and cultural studies, diaspora studies, migration studies, transnational studies, globalisation studies, critical space studies, urban studies, film studies, media studies, art history, philosophy, history, and anthropology.
Contributors: Diana Brydon, Lars Eckstein, Paloma Fresno-Calleja, Lucia Krämer, Gesa Mackenthun, Thomas Martinek, Sandra Meyer, Therese-M. Meyer, Marga Munkelt, Lynda Ng, Claudia Perner, Katharina Rennhak, Gundo Rial y Costas, Markus Schmitz, Mark Stein, Silke Stroh, Kathy-Ann Tan, Petra Tournay-Theodotou, Daria Tunca, Jessica Voges, Roland Walter, Dirk Wiemann.