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Editors: Theo D'haen and Hans Bertens
Postmodern Studies deals with (any aspect of) postmodernism, or of postmodernity and the postmodern in relation to literature.

Publications in this series can be either of a theoretical or a more practical/analytic nature. They may refer to any one, or to several, literary works, genres, or literatures. They may also refer to the other arts, provided the main focus remain literary. In evaluating contributions, the editors of Postmodern Studies will follow no particular methodological or ideological bias.

All manuscripts accepted in the series first undergo a process of peer review.

Due to rapid developments in literary studies we close the series for new publications.

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/156920608X296088 Historical Materialism 16 (2008) 85–115 www.brill.nl/hima Postmodern Contributions to Marxian Economics: Th eoretical Innovations and their Implications for Class Politics David Kristjanson-Gural Bucknell University, Lewisburg

In: Historical Materialism
Charles S. Peirce and the Pragmatist Negotiations of Thomas Pynchon, Toni Morrison, and Jonathan Safran Foer
Author: Katrin Amian
Rethinking Postmodernism(s) revisits three historical sites of American literary postmodernism: the early postmodernism of Thomas Pynchon’s V. (1961), the emancipatory postmodernism of Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987), and the late or post-postmodernism of Jonathan Safran Foer’s Everything Is Illuminated (2002). For the first time, it confronts these texts with the pragmatist philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce, staging a conceptual dialogue between pragmatism and postmodernism that historicizes and recontextualizes customary readings of postmodern fiction. The book is a must-read for all interested in current reassessments of literary postmodernism, in new critical dialogues between seminal postmodern texts, and in recent attempts to theorize the ‘post-postmodern’ moment.
Editor: Steven Earnshaw
The essays collected here represent the latest thinking on postmodernism in a number of key areas: economics, law, postcolonialism, literature, feminism, film, philosophy. One of the issues common to the volume is the desire to cast postmodernism in a predominantly ethical ('just') light, and the opportunities and obstacles postmodernism might place in the path of the description of, and search for, justice. The collection highlights the most recent trends in postmodern thinking, the turn away from postmodernism as mere discourse and language games to a more politically and socially engaged forum. The book will be of interest to all students of contemporary cultural, social and critical thought.
Voicing the Terrors of Postmodernity
Author: Maria Beville
Being the first to outline the literary genre, Gothic-postmodernism, this book articulates the psychological and philosophical implications of terror in postmodernist literature, analogous to the terror of the Gothic novel, uncovering the significance of postmodern recurrences of the Gothic, and identifying new historical and philosophical aspects of the genre. While many critics propose that the Gothic has been exhausted, and that its significance is depleted by consumer society’s obsession with instantaneous horror, analyses of a number of terror-based postmodernist novels here suggest that the Gothic is still very much animated in Gothic-postmodernism. These analyses observe the spectral characters, doppelgangers, hellish waste lands and the demonised or possessed that inhabit texts such as Paul Auster’s City of Glass, Salman Rushdie’s The Satanic Verses and Bret Easton Ellis’s Lunar Park. However, it is the deeper issue of the lingering emotion of terror as it relates to loss of reality and self, and to death, that is central to the study; a notion of ‘terror’ formulated from the theories of continental philosophers and contemporary cultural theorists. With a firm emphasis on the sublime and the unrepresentable as fundamental to this experience of terror; vital to the Gothic genre; and central to the postmodern experience, this study offers an insightful and concise definition of Gothic-postmodernism. It firmly argues that ‘terror’ (with all that it involves) remains a connecting and potent link between the Gothic and postmodernism: two modes of literature that together offer a unique voicing of the unspeakable terrors of postmodernity.