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the potential reproductive rates of males and females and/or (2) a mate familiarity effect that increased reproductive success in successive matings. Further research could investigate relationships between mating pattern and varying intersexual differences in potential repro- ductive rates across

In: Behaviour

selection is the outcome of sexual differences in potential reproductive rates (PRRs): the sex with the higher PRR will compete for mates and the sex with the lower PRR will be most selective. This study tests the theory experimentally by examining competition for mates and mate choice in the black

In: Behaviour

number of independent young that a parent can produce per unit time) can be assessed and are better predictors of sexual selection pressures through being more directly related to the OSR (CLUTTON-BROCK & VINCENT, 1991). The sex with the higher potential reproductive rate will compete more intensely for

In: Netherlands Journal of Zoology

defined as the proportion of males ready to breed to females ready to breed. A major factor determining the OSR is the potential reproductive rate. The dominant factor influencing the potential rates of reproduction of the two sexes is the relative proportion of time or energy expended by the males and

In: Behaviour

of sex roles in mating competition (EMLEN & ORING, 1977). Sex differences in potential reproductive rate are the best empirical predictor of the OSR, incor- porating elements such as sex differences in parental investment, risk of predation and anatomical constraints (CLUTTON-BROCK & VINCENT, 1

In: Behaviour

- ing systems. According to this hypothesis, sexually selected traits should be most apparent in species with a pronounced intersexual divergence in potential reproductive rates (Clutton-Brock & Parker, 1992), a condition found in polygamous mating systems (Andersson, 1994). The function, as well as the

In: Behaviour

(Amphibia: Caudata) exhibit consid- erable asymmetry between the sexes in potential reproductive rate. Males are able to produce spermatophores, and engage in courtship and mating, much faster than females can produce clutches of eggs. As a consequence, females are a resource that limits the potential

In: Behaviour

dual function: attracting males and repelling females. References Ahnesjö, I. (1995). Temperature affects male and female potential reproductive rates differ- ently in the sex-role reversed pipefish, Syngnathus typhle. - Behav. Ecol. 6, p. 229- 233. Andersson, M.B. (1994). Sexual selection. - Princeton

In: Behaviour

ability. In several animal species females signal their recep- tivity (references in ROWLAND et al., 1991; SIKKEL, 1993) indicating that males may be choosy. Because male sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus, have a greater potential reproductive rate than females, females should be selective in choosing

In: Behaviour

trade-off between intra-sexual competition and inter-sexual behaviour. We discuss the results in the context of mating system evolution. Keywords : density-dependence, mating system, sexual selection, sperm competition, territo- riality. Introduction Differences in potential reproductive rate, resulting

In: Behaviour