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the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is against this background that the editors’ decision to compile a complete and comprehensive interlocutory decisions and Trial and Appeals Chamber judgements in the case of Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara and Kanu ( AFRC case ) must be appreciated and welcome

In: African Journal of Legal Studies
In: The Law Reports of the Special Court for Sierra Leone (2 vols.)
In: The Law Reports of the Special Court for Sierra Leone (2 vols.)

; Prosecutor v. Brima , Kamara and Kanu , ( AFRC case) . 1. Introduction It is estimated that as many as 257,000 women and girls were subjected to sexual violence during the civil war in Sierra Leone. 1 Th is astounding fi gure is even more alarming when accompanied with an understanding of the extreme

In: International Criminal Law Review

peacekeepers, and sexual slavery: the judgments in the RUF case ( Prosecutor v . Sesay, Kallon and Gbao ) and the AFRC case ( Prosecutor v . Brima, Kamara and Kanu ) together reveal two diff erent processes through which the law has proven able to evolve and adapt to accommodate so-called ‘new’ crimes without

In: International Criminal Law Review
Volume I: Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara and Kanu (The AFRC Case)
The Special Court for Sierra Leone was established through signature of a bilateral treaty between the United Nations and the Government of Sierra Leone in early 2002, making it the third modern ad hoc international criminal tribunal. The tribunal has tried various persons, including former Liberian President Charles Ghankay Taylor, for allegedly bearing "greatest responsibility" for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed during the latter half of the Sierra Leonean armed conflict.

This volume, which consists of two books and a DVD and is edited by two legal experts on the Sierra Leone court, presents, for the first time in a single place, a comprehensive collection of all the interlocutory decisions and final trial and appeals judgments issued by the court in the case Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara and Kanu. It contains the full text of all substantive judicial decisions, including the majority, separate and concurring as well as dissenting opinions. It additionally provides relevant information for a better understanding of the case, such as the indictments, a list of admitted exhibits and a list of documents on the case file.

The book, which is only the first in a series of edited law reports that will capture the entire jurisprudential legacy of the tribunal, fills the gap for a single and authoritative reference source of the tribunal’s jurisprudence. It is intended for national and international judges, lawyers, academics, students and other researchers as well as transitional justice practitioners in courts, tribunals and truth commissions as well as anyone seeking an accurate record of the trials conducted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

N.B.: The hardback copy of this title contains a DVD with documents. The e-book version does not.
Volume III: Prosecutor v. Charles Ghankay Taylor (The Taylor Case)
The Special Court for Sierra Leone was established through signature of a bilateral treaty between the United Nations and the Government of Sierra Leone in early 2002, making it the third modern ad hoc international criminal tribunal. The tribunal has tried various persons, including former Liberian President Charles Ghankay Taylor, for allegedly bearing "greatest responsibility" for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed during the latter half of the Sierra Leonean armed conflict. It completed its work in December 2013. A new Residual Special Court for Sierra Leone, based in Freetown and with offices in The Hague, has been created to carry out its essential “residual” functions.
This volume, which consists of three books and a CD-ROM and is edited by two legal experts on the Sierra Leone court, presents, for the first time in a single place, a comprehensive collection of all the interlocutory decisions and final trial and appeals judgments issued by the court in the case Prosecutor v. Charles Ghankay Taylor. The Taylor case is the jewel in the crown of the SCSL, as it was the first ever trial and conviction of a former African head of state for crimes committed in a neighboring state. It is also one of a handful of such significant cases in international criminal law.
The Taylor Law Report contains the full text of all substantive judicial decisions, including the majority, separate and concurring as well as dissenting opinions and probably the longest trial judgment ever issued by an international criminal court. It additionally provides relevant information for a better understanding of the case, such as the indictments, a list of admitted exhibits and a list of documents on the case file.
This book set, which is the third in a series of edited law reports that follows volume 1 (on Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara and Kanu – the so-called “AFRC case” published in November 2012) and volume 2 ( Prosecutor v. Norman, Fofana and Kondewa – the “CDF case” published in March 2014) seeks to capture the entire jurisprudential legacy of the tribunal, fills the gap for a single and authoritative reference source of the tribunal’s jurisprudence. These law reports, the last volumes of which will be published in 2015 and 2016, are intended for national and international judges, lawyers, academics, students and other researchers as well as transitional justice practitioners in courts, tribunals and truth commissions as well as anyone seeking an accurate record of the trials conducted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

N.B.: The hardback copy of this title contains a CD-ROM with the scanned decisions that are reproduced in the book and the trial transcripts.
The e-book version does not.

former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and Rwanda (ICTR). On 20 June 2007, the SCSL handed down its fi rst judgement in the case of Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara and Kanu , also known as the “Armed Forces Revolu- tionary Council” or “AFRC” accused. 6 Th e AFRC Judgement, which has been described as an “important

In: The Law & Practice of International Courts and Tribunals

this onus is derived from a general 25 Prosecutor v Brima, Kamara and Kanu , (Sentencing Judgment) SCSL-04-16-T (19 July 2007) para. 32. 26 Articles 20 and 21 of the Statutes of the ICTR and ICTY respectively, do not address this issue – see in particular, Article 17(3) SCSL, Article 20(3) ICTR and

In: African Journal of Legal Studies

-General submitted a report on the implementation of Resolution 1315. 10 He proposed a Special Court that was unlike the International Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, which had been established by resolutions of the Security 5 Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara, Kanu, Case No. SCSL-04-16-PT, “Order for

In: The Law & Practice of International Courts and Tribunals