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Author: Ian Birchall

My thanks to Mike Jones, Ben Lewis and John Rose for comments on a first draft. I have learned a great deal from correspondence with Mike Jones, though he does not share my conclusions. David Fernbach (ed.), In the Steps of Rosa Luxemburg: Selected Writings of Paul Levi , Leiden: Brill, 2011

In: Historical Materialism
Author: Paul Levi

The following two documents, originally drafted by Paul Levi and rendered for the first time in English (Paul Levi’s ‘Letter to the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Germany’ on the Kapp Putsch, of 16 March 1920 , and his ‘Open Letter’ of 8 January 1921), are a documentary appendix to

In: Historical Materialism
Author: Daniel Gaido

expelled from the Communist Party of Germany (Spartacus League) during its second congress, held at Heidelberg from 20 to 24 October 1919, which adopted the ‘Guiding Principles of Communist Precepts and Tactics’ (also known as the ‘Heidelberg Theses’) at the request of Paul Levi, the political heir of Rosa

In: Historical Materialism
Author: David Fernbach

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2009 DOI: 10.1163/156920609X460381 Historical Materialism 17 (2009) 101–110 brill.nl/hima Editorial Introduction to Paul Levi, Our Path and What Is the Crime? David Fernbach david.fernbach@wanadoo.fr Abstract Th ese two key texts of German Communism appear in

In: Historical Materialism
Author: Pierre Broué

Chapter Forty-Five Paul Levi:The Lost Opportunity? Was Paul Levi a Communist? This question needed to be asked from the moment when he refused to take the hand which Lenin extended to him by way of his correspondence with Clara Zetkin. Radek regarded Levi not as a Communist but as a bourgeois

In: The German Revolution, 1917-1923
Author: Pierre Broué

Chapter Twenty-Two Paul Levi: A German Conception of Communism Following the Halle Congress, and for the first time since the Communist International was founded, a mass Communist Party existed in one of the most advanced countries of Europe, Germany, the country which revolutionaries always

In: The German Revolution, 1917-1923
Editors / Translators: Paul Goldin and Elisa Levi Sabattini
Lu Jia's New Discourses: A Political Manifesto from the Early Han Dynasty is a readable yet accurate translation by Paul R. Goldin and Elisa Levi Sabattini.
Celebrated as “a man-of-service with a mouth [skilled] at persuasion”, Lu Jia (c. 228-140 BCE) became one of the leading figures of the early Han dynasty, serving as a statesman and diplomat from the very beginning of the Han empire. This book is a translation of Lu Jia’s New Discourses, which laid out the reasons for rise and fall of empires. Challenged by the new Emperor to produce a book explaining why a realm that was conquered on horseback cannot also be ruled on horseback, Lu Jia produced New Discourses, to great acclaim.
Author: Daniel Gaido

The united-front tactic found its first formulation at the initiative of the Stuttgart metalworkers in December 1920, and became the official policy of the KPD with the publication of the ‘Open Letter’ of the Zentrale of the United Communist Party of Germany, drafted by Paul Levi, on 8

In: Historical Materialism
Author: Pierre Broué
On 12 October 1923, Grigory Zinoviev, president of the Communist International wrote the following in Pravda:

The German events are developing with the inexorability of fate. The path which it took the Russian Revolution twelve years to cover, from 1906 to 1917, will have taken the German Revolution five years, from 1918 to 1923. … The proletarian revolution is knocking at Germany’s door; you would have to be blind not to see it. … Very soon, everyone will see that this autumn of 1923 is a turning-point, not just for the history of Germany, but for the history of the whole world.

In fact, far from being on the point of triumphing, the German Revolution was on the verge of an irredeemable disaster which would soon inflict terrible consequences on Germany and the world.

In this magisterial work, first published 1971 and still unsurpassed, Pierre Broué meticulously reconstitutes the six decisive years during which — between ‘ultra-leftism and ‘opportunism’, ‘sectarianism’ and ‘revisionism’, ‘activism’ and ‘passivity’ — the German revolutionaries attempted to begin a new chapter in the history of the proletariat.
Editor: David Fernbach
Paul Levi remains one of the most interesting and controversial figures in the early history of the Communist movement. As leader of the KPD after the murder of Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht, he successfully built up a party of a third of a million members, but by 1921 Comintern pressure for ‘Bolshevisation’ forced Levi’s resignation and expulsion. Until his early death in 1930 he remained ‘a revolutionary socialist of the Rosa Luxemburg school’ (Carl von Ossietsky), and was described by Albert Einstein as ‘one of the wisest, most just and courageous persons I have come across’. The first English edition of Levi’s writings fills a long-standing gap in the documents of German Communism.