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Edited by Ali Asghar Seyed-Gohrab

This volume is a collection of essays on classical Persian literature, focusing on Persian rhetorical devices, especially imagery and metaphors. The various contributions discuss the origin and the development of debate poetry, the transmission of Persian and Arabic tales to the works of Europeans medieval authors such as Boccaccio and Chaucer, but also the development of Aristotelian poetics and epistemology in Persian philosophical tradition. Furthermore, the baroque style of the Shiʿite author Ḥusayn Vāʾiẓ Kāshifī, the use of wine metaphors by mystics such as Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī, Ḥāfiẓ’s original use of candle metaphors, the translation of Khayyām’s metaphors into English, and the importance of a single metaphor in the epic Barzū-nāma are discussed.

Contributors include: F. Abdullaeva, G.R. van den Berg, J. Landau, F.D. Lewis, N. Pourjavady, Ch. van Ruymbeke, A. Sedighi and S. Sharma
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Mahmud Sadeqi-Zadeh

literary characteristics of mul “wine” in Per- sian poetry. Unlike may , which is a wide-spread term denoting “wine” in New Per- sian, mul is never employed in the writings of many outstanding representatives of Persian poetry from the early period until R dak and Daq q . The first occur- rences of this

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Karimi-Hakkak

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Philip Hopkins

Book Reviews / Iran and the Caucasus 14 (2010) 452-454 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI: 10.1163/157338410X12743419190629 452 Leonard Lewisohn (ed.), Hafiz and the Religion of Love in Classical Persian Poetry , New York: “I. B. Tauris”, 2010, 330 pp. Iranians’ rich and storied culture

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Yaseen Noorani

THE REBELLIOUS SUBJECT: POLITICAL SELF-FASHIONING IN ARABIC AND PERSIAN POETRY OF THE COLONIAL PERIOD In the year 1911, during one of the darker moments of the Constitutio- nal Revolution in Iran, the fragile new polity, crumbling within and under pressure from without, seemed to be on the

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Yaseen Noorani

THE REBELLIOUS SUBJECT: POLITICAL SELF-FASHIONING IN ARABIC AND PERSIAN POETRY OF THE COLONIAL PERIOD In the year 1911, during one of the darker moments of the Constitutio- nal Revolution in Iran, the fragile new polity, crumbling within and under pressure from without, seemed to be on the

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Theodore S. Beers

’s turbulent emotional state. Various pre-modern biographers (see below) associated Vahshi with either the ‘incidentalist’ (tarz-e voqu‘) or the ‘fresh’ ( shiva-ye tāza ) style of Persian poetry. No attempt will be made here to determine which of those is the more accurate categorization, but it is fair to

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Mukhliṣ Kāshānī

Persian poetry of the pre-modern era is divided into three successive styles, each belonging to a different period: Khurāsānī, ʿIrāqī and Hindī. The Hindī style is called such because in Safavid times, during which it developed, poets no longer enjoyed the shah’s patronage so that many of them went to India, where Persian poetry had flourished since Ghaznavid times (11th-12th cent.). The Hindī style is often regarded as being of a lesser kind than the Khurāsānī or ʿIrāqī ones, but has the merit of having put a halt to the decline that Persian poetry was suffering from at the time and also, by its accessible language and subject matter, of having brought poetry within reach of the ordinary man. The Hindī style of those who never went to India is commonly described as ‘Iṣfahānī’. Mukhliṣ Kāshānī’s (d. 1150/1737) poetry is Hindī in the Iṣfahānī variant and is published here for the very first time.
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Asīr Shahristānī

Persian poetry of the pre-modern era is divided into three successive styles, each belonging to a different period: Khurāsānī, ʿIrāqī and Hindī. The Hindī style’s name comes from Safavid times, during which it developed; poets no longer enjoyed the shah’s patronage, so that many of them went to India, where Persian poetry had flourished from Ghaznavid times (11th-12th cent.). The Hindī style is often regarded as being of a lesser kind than the Khurāsānī or ʿIrāqī ones, but has the merit of having ended the decline that Persian poetry was suffering from at the time and also, by its accessible language and subject matter, of having brought poetry within reach of the ordinary man. The poems of Asīr Shahristānī (11th/17th cent.), whose ghazals are published here, are written in the Hindī style. Popular in India, even if he never went there, their appreciation in Iran has varied.