Erler, Michael. (2017) Platon, Werke: Übersetzung und Kommentar. Band VI.1: Euthydemos . Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht. 283 pp. Pr. € 70 (hb). ISBN 978-3-525-30413-6. Michael Erler’s commentary on Plato’s Euthydemus is a very welcome addition to existing scholarship on the dialogue. It is a

In: Mnemosyne

1 Introduction The Eleatic Visitor or Stranger ( xenos ) appears only in Plato’s Sophist and Statesman , where he uses a method of division to answer a question Socrates asks: ‘Do they [where the Stranger comes from] think that all these [Sophist, Statesman, and Philosopher] are one or

In: Phronesis

1 Introduction The Philebus represents Plato’s most mature and considered thinking about the nature of pleasure. Given his apparent commitment to the Socratic principle that before one may confidently reach any conclusions about x one must first give an account of x itself, we ought to expect

In: Phronesis
Author: Mario Vegetti

as a result of copyists’ errors, given that the Greek tradition consistently presents Plato’s Politeia as a work which comprises ten books. In 1937, the Soviet scholar Josiph Vissarionovich announced the discovery of an ancient manuscript in an Armenian monastery, consisting of the text of an

In: Historical Materialism
Author: Mor Segev

1 Introduction Toward the end of Politics V . 12, Aristotle criticizes Plato’s discussion of political change in Republic VIII-IX . This criticism is often taken to be unjustified or misdirected on several points. In particular, it has been suggested that Aristotle unfairly portrays

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought
Author: Jonathan Culp

. In Plato’s Republic , Socrates faces a twofold challenge: to explain what justice is, and to prove that it is in every way better to be just than to be unjust. The need for this defence stems from the suspicion (on the part of Glaucon and Adeimantus) or the certainty (on the part of Thrasymachus

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought

1 Introduction At various points in his dialogues Plato criticizes or mocks the Eleusinians, Orphics and Pythagoreans (notably R. 363c-d, 364-366, 378a, 560e; Tht. 155e-156c). 1 Yet he repeatedly refers to their doctrines and often employs language associated with these mystery cults

In: Mnemosyne
Brill’s Plato Studies Series aims to gather together the most recent and relevant contributions, in order to identify debates and trends within the study of Plato and to provide a holistic understanding of the wide range of issues related to Plato’s philosophy. Of special significance for the series will be the examination of Plato’s literary style and its relationship to his theoretical project as, perhaps, one of the central problems in the study of Plato and Ancient Philosophy as a whole. Even after two thousand years there is still no consensus about why Plato expresses his ideas in such a unique style and the series will aim to address this question. In addition, the Series will warmly welcome contributions focusing on internal and recurrent issues like the relation between myth and philosophy, language, epistemology and ontology in Plato’s work. Special attention will also be given to new interpretative challenges and recent hermeneutical trends, which have emerged from the globalization of current Platonic studies. These new approaches to Plato are likely to change the future frame of Platonic scholarship, providing instruments and renewed impulses for the generations of philosophers to come.