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Child sexual abuse and assault can be characterized by an individual committing a sexual act against other individuals who are too young to consent. Sexual acts could range from verbal sexual harassment, to sexual organs being fondled, to penetration (oral or genital), and other sexual acts. Perpetrators stem from heterogeneous populations and can be related to their victims, known by their victims or, more rarely, strangers to their victims. Victims of sexual abuse can suffer short-term and long term adverse consequences on different levels. In many, mostly western, societies the occurrence of child sexual abuse is regarded as a traumatic experience for the victims on an individual level and as a problem of the corresponding society on a macro-societal level. One (Western) response to the problem has been the development of group-based empowerment prevention programmes which are seen as cost cutting and cost-effective. Still, many critiques view the empowerment model is ineffective and dangerous for children at the same time. Some critiques are outlined here and suggestions are made for further preventive directions in child protection.

In: Sexuality, Oppression and Human Rights
Author: Monica Den Boer

-assessment , as it seeks to predict the potential of multiple futures. Prevention or pre-emption in both internal and external security environments has become an almost unnoticed underlying logic, thus preparing the ground for legitimizing the widespread use of surveillance instruments for the pro

In: Security and Human Rights
The European Convention for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment entered into force in February 1989 and all 47 member States are Parties to the Convention. It has already established itself as an important human rights instrument. Its approach is quite different from that of the European Convention on Human Rights. Whereas the ECHR provides a remedy for particular human rights violations after the event, the Convention for the Prevention of Torture seeks to prevent human rights violations, through a system of visits to places of detention. The Convention is intended to be an integrated part of the Council of Europe system for the protection of human rights, placing a proactive non-judicial mechanism alongside the reactive judicial mechanism established under the ECHR.
The Yearbook of the European Convention for the Prevention of Torture offers an essential annual overview, in English and French, of developments in relation to the Convention for the Prevention of Torture. It contains information on ratifications in the authentic English and French texts, details of the membership and activities of the Convention, as well as the annual General Report and reports to States and the State responses thereto. The ECPT's reports are published in the official English and/or French texts and State responses in the English and/or French versions submitted by the States concerned.

Volumes of the Yearbook of the European Convention for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment are also available as E-Book.
Author: Diego Zannoni
Is international law equipped to tackle the challenges posed by the dramatic increase in disasters? In Disaster Management and International Space Law Diego Zannoni attempts to answer this crucial question through an analysis of the main legal issues involved, addressing both prevention and relief, with a special focus on major space applications such as remote sensing and telecommunications, and the attendant specific legal regimes.
It is argued that, when lives of human beings are in danger, territorial sovereignty becomes, to a certain extent, porous and bends in front of the value of human life and the urgent need to rescue. On the other hand, specific obligations were identified to cooperate in the prevention and management of disasters, particularly in terms of data sharing.
Quarterly on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Editor-in-Chief: Arie Bloed
Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help. Please note: As of 2008 Helsinki Monitor is published as Security and Human Rights. Four times a year, Helsinki Monitor reports on developments in and related to the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). It covers new and ongoing measures taken in the context of the Helsinki process, including preventive diplomacy, arms control, human rights, confidence-building, security, democracy building, election monitoring, economic security, and environmental matters. With its thorough analysis and background information, Helsinki Monitor has become a primary source of reference on the OSCE process. The journal, founded in 1990, is a legacy of the Helsinki process that was designed during the Cold War, to bridge Eastern and Western Europe on the basis of common principles and co-operative security. It brings to light current developments affecting human rights, peace and security across North America, and wider Europe including Central Asia. Major themes include: • Conflict prevention; • Human rights; • Minorities; • Democracy building; and • Cooperative security. The journal not only reflects on developments, it draws attention to problems, and contributes to the policy-making discourse. With its thorough analysis and thought-provoking articles, Security and Human Rights is a must-read for all those interested and involved in the OSCE and the process of guaranteeing security and protecting human rights. Readers will find a regular column, both short and long articles, a chronicle of OSCE events, as well as occasional book reviews and interviews. Helsinki Monitor is published by Koninklijke Brill N.V. in cooperation with the Netherlands Helsinki Committee (NHC) and the International Helsinki Federation (IHF), which continue to be responsible for its contents. For back volumes older than 2 years, please contact William S. Hein & Co., Inc., 1285 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209 orders@wshein.com / www.wshein.com or Periodicals Service Company, 11 Main Street, Germantown, NY 12526, USA psc@periodicals.com / www.periodicals.com/brill.html

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Security and Human Rights (formerly > Helsinki Monitor) is a quarterly journal devoted to issues inspired by the work and principles of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). It looks at the challenge of building security through cooperation across the northern hemisphere, from Vancouver to Vladivostok, as well as how this experience can be applied to other parts of the world. It aims to stimulate thinking on the question of protecting and promoting human rights in a world faced with serious threats to security.
The journal, founded in 1990 under the title Helsinki Monitor, is a legacy of the Helsinki process that was designed during the Cold War, to bridge Eastern and Western Europe on the basis of common principles and co-operative security.
It brings to light current developments affecting human rights, peace and security across North America, and wider Europe including Central Asia. Major themes include:
• Conflict prevention;
• Human rights;
• Minorities;
• Democracy building; and
• Cooperative security.

The journal not only reflects on developments, it draws attention to problems, and contributes to the policy-making discourse. With its thorough analysis and thought-provoking articles, Security and Human Rights is a must-read for all those interested and involved in the OSCE and the process of guaranteeing security and protecting human rights. Readers will find a regular column, both short and long articles, a chronicle of OSCE events, as well as occasional book reviews and interviews.

Online submission: Articles for publication in Security and Human Rights can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

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The Journal of International Humanitarian Legal Studies is a peer reviewed journal aimed at promoting the rule of law in humanitarian emergency situations and, in particular, the protection and assistance afforded to persons in the event of armed conflicts and natural disasters in all phases and facets under international law.

The Journal welcomes submissions in the areas of international humanitarian law, international human rights law, international refugee law and international law relating to disaster response. In addition, other areas of law can be identified including, but not limited to the norms regulating the prevention of humanitarian emergency situations, the law concerning internally displaced persons, arms control and disarmament law, legal issues relating to human security, and the implementation and enforcement of humanitarian norms.

The Journal´s objective is to further the understanding of these legal areas in their own right as well as in their interplay. The Journal encourages writing beyond the theoretical level taking into account the practical implications from the perspective of those who are or may be affected by humanitarian emergency situations.

The Journal aims at and seeks the perspective of academics, government and organisation officials, military lawyers, practitioners working in the humanitarian (legal) field, as well as students and other individuals interested therein.

Authors are cordially invited to send their submissions to editors@jihls.net..

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.

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Editor-in-Chief: Jannemieke Ouwerkerk
Announcing the European Journal for Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice Young Scholar Competition. Read full details here.

Crime, criminal law and criminal justice are no longer purely national issues in today’s Europe. Criminal conduct is becoming increasingly denationalised because offenders can easily cross borders and through the emergence of the Internet and cyberspace. It is also increasingly common for individuals either to face criminal proceedings or to become victims of crime in countries other than their own. Nevertheless, efforts to combat crime, and to safeguard the rights of victims, are still organised on a, by and large, national basis.

These factors are driving the need for a better understanding of crime in Europe, as well as many important debates to which it gives rise. They include: how best to respond to crimes that affect more than one state; how to strike an appropriate balance between respect for national criminal justice traditions and the tendency to harmonise legislation and practice; and how to ensure that it is possible for suspects, offenders and victims to rely upon an adequate level of protection of their fundamental rights wherever they come into contact with a criminal justice system in Europe. Criminal policy is therefore increasingly prominent on the political agenda of the key European players, above all the European Union and the Council of Europe. Not only are their growing roles reshaping the governance of criminal law and justice, but these bodies are themselves becoming a target of offending behaviour.

The European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice provides a forum for public debate on these European issues. It seeks not only to bridge the gap between European players and European states, but also to afford space for a non-European view on developments in these fields. Our aim, in other words, is to offer a multi-dimensional international and comparative perspective on crime, criminal law and criminal justice in Europe. We welcome papers from any relevant disciplinary outlook or approach, including those that are contextually, doctrinally, empirically or theoretically based.

Publication Prize for the European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice
Brill|Nijhoff is delighted to announce the introduction of a bi-annual prize for the most outstanding article published in the European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice. To encourage and reward publication in the Journal, the author of the chosen article will receive 10 free copies of the issue in which their article was published as well as a €400 voucher for Brill|Nijhoff books.

The winner of the bi-annual prize will be chosen by the Editorial Board of the Journal. All authors who have had an article published in the Journal over the previous two years will be considered.

Online submission: Articles for publication in the European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

They should have a clear European focus: that is, they should discuss norms and/or policies of a European origin (European Union/Council of Europe); or compare the legislation, policies or practices in European states; or analyse the manifestations or representations of crime and/or its impact; or contribute to the criminological debate in Europe. As a rule, they should not exceed 8,500 words. Review articles as well as short contributions (i.e., significantly fewer than 8,500 words) discussing topical issues will also be considered for publication. Articles written in American or British English are acceptable, though the latter is preferred.

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.