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Abstract

This article deals with the numerous psalm songs that Martin Opitz composed between 1626 and 1638 to melodies from the Geneva Psalter. It discusses them in the context of the great tradition of Protestant psalm songs which had flourished since the Reformation and considers their role for Opitz’s poetics and linguistic reflection (‘Spracharbeit’). In the first part, the essay presents Opitz’s translation work on the Psalter showing that the poet wanted to create a normative example of German-language sacred poetry. We then reconstruct Opitz’s poetics on the basis of his songs on Psalm 6, linking it to the European tradition of the psalm song as well as to theological and dogmatic issues.

In: Artes
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Abstract

Using the song “Sie ist mir lieb, die werte Magd” by Martin Luther (1535) and psalm songs from the hymnal of the Leipzig pastor Cornelius Becker (1602) as examples, this article asks about the image of the ‘church’ in Lutheran songs of the Reformation and the Confessional Age and how this image in particular developed in the 16th and 17th centuries. What Luther and Becker have in common is that their songs aimed to create a sense of belonging and an awareness of one’s own identity within the singing Protestant community. Church songs, whose themes could also be about the church, thus served not least to build up the church in the spirit of the Reformation.

In: Artes
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review surveys the reception history of the Psalm songs published in the German-speaking regions of Europe between 1523 and 1650. It is a lightly revised edition of a theological dissertation. The author is well-versed both in the history of German Psalters and in the theological, sociological, and

In: Church History and Religious Culture

in the preface to his Expositiones on the Psalms as a “Psalm-Song.” In the preface to Cassiodorus’ Liber expositio psalmorum , the writer has much to say about the Psalms, both as a group, and, being somewhat of a pedant, divided into categories according to type and usage. With the psalter

In: Illuminating Jesus in the Middle Ages

Cassiodorus in the preface to his Expositiones on the Psalms as a “Psalm-Song.” In the preface to Cassiodorus’ Liber expositio psalmorum , the writer has much to say about the Psalms, both as a group, and, being somewhat of a pedant, divided into categories according to type and usage. With the psalter

In: Illuminating Jesus in the Middle Ages

result was a broad palette of themes and genres (psalm songs, creed songs, didactic songs, domestic songs, catechism songs). At Zürich, Huldrych Zwingli and Leo Jud wrote geistliche Lieder, but they did not allot them a place in the liturgy. John Calvin, on the other hand, used thirteen psalm songs by

fratrum ). The result was a broad palette of themes and genres (psalm songs, creed songs, didactic songs, domestic songs, catechism songs). At Zürich, Huldrych Zwingli and Leo Jud wrote geistliche Lieder , but they did not allot them a place in the liturgy. John Calvin, on the other hand

in Encyclopedia of Early Modern History Online
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forms of lay ministry universal in the Roman Catholic Church, a new ministry of reader. In addition to reading the OT and Epistle lections, the reader is also permitted to lead the assembly in psalm, song, and prayer. The ministry of reader is not limited to candidates for the diaconate or priesthood

in The Encyclopedia of Christianity Online
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worship. In polyphonic versions, the Psalm-songs also served artistic singing in schools and at home (Bourgeois, C. Goudimel , later Claude Le Jeune, c.1530–1600, J.P. Sweelinck et al. ). Translations of the Psalms into other languages began soon after the completion of the Geneva

in Religion Past and Present Online

by Ben Sira’s implied audience. Rather than being a braggart, Ben Sira advises his students not to interrupt the singing ( תמנע שיר ; µὴ ἐµποδίσῃς µουσικά). MSS B and F also add that a banquet should not be “without a psalm/song” (v. 4; בלא מזמר ), and they extol “the sound of a psalm/song with

In: Sirach and Its Contexts