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Trans-Disciplinary Research of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls
Much of the previous sixty years (1949-2009) have been devoted to the cleaning of the Dead Sea scrolls, their piecing together and their translation. The present volume is a scientific study of the various archaeological relics that have been found in the three units at Qumran: The settlement, the caves with the scrolls and the cemetery. With the aid of neutron activation of Qumran's pottery we established its human relations with neighboring sites, by radio carbon dating we placed the relics in their time frame, by DNA we study the provenance of the animal hides that served the scribes as parchment. The ink is studied for examining the degradation processes that started when the scrolls were written, 2000-2300 years ago.
Author: Paul Heger

Journal for the Study of Judaism 42 (2011) 188-217 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/157006311X565091 brill.nl/jsj Journal for the Study of Judaism Stringency in Qumran? Paul Heger 65 Harbour Sq. #3308, Toronto ON M5J 2L4, Canada pheger@gmail.com Abstract Some scholars allege a

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism
Author: John J. Collins

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2009 DOI: 10.1163/156851709X473978 Dead Sea Discoveries 16 (2009) 351–369 brill.nl/dsd Beyond the Qumran Community: Social Organization in the Dead Sea Scrolls * John J. Collins Yale Divinity School, 409 Prospect, New Haven, CT 06511 john

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Editor: Eugene Ulrich
The Biblical Qumran Scrolls presents all the Hebrew biblical manuscripts recovered from the eleven caves at Qumran. It provides a transcription of each identifiable fragment in consecutive biblical order together with the textual variants it contains. These manuscripts antedate by a millennium the previously available Hebrew manuscripts. They are the oldest, the best, and the most authentic witnesses to the texts of the Scriptures as they circulated in Jerusalem and surrounding regions at the time of the birth of Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism. The purpose is to collect in a single volume all the biblical editions originally published in a wide variety of books and articles.
Author: Edward M. Cook

majority of CP participles in Late Aramaic show short /a/ in the first syllable. 2. The Vocalism of the CP Stem in Qumran Aramaic One of the last dialects of Aramaic to use the CP stem for finite verbal forms was Qumran Aramaic, where it appears several times in a variety of texts. The

In: Aramaic Studies

of Hebrew Bible, where biblical law and wisdom are often studied in different scholarly networks, the newly discovered Jewish legal texts in the narrower sense—excluding for the moment the Rule texts 4 —and the previously unknown sapiential texts from Qumran attracted the attention, for the most part

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism
Author: Joel Marcus

to early Judaism, especially the Qumran community, than on what I say about his relationship to early Christianity. I will therefore concentrate here on John’s relation to Judaism in general and to Qumran in particular. I do, however, want to start by addressing one aspect of John’s relationship to

In: Journal for the Study of the Historical Jesus
Editor: Eugene Ulrich
The Biblical Qumran Scrolls paperback edition presents in three volumes all the Hebrew biblical manuscripts recovered from the eleven caves at Qumran. It provides a transcription of each identifiable fragment in consecutive biblical order together with the textual variants it contains. These manuscripts antedate by a millennium the previously available Hebrew manuscripts. They are the oldest, the best, and the most authentic witnesses to the texts of the Scriptures as they circulated in Jerusalem and surrounding regions at the time of the birth of Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism. The purpose is to collect in three paperback volumes all the biblical editions originally published in a wide variety of books and articles.
This volume deals with the Aramaic Levi Document, also known as Aramaic Levi or the Aramaic Testament of Levi. Chapter one contains a systematic reflection on the content of this Aramaic work, situates it in the historical context of the Second Temple period, and looks for an answer as to its literary structure and genre. Then in chapter two the manuscripts from Cairo Genizah, Mount Athos, and Qumran are edited together with their English translation, paleographical notes, and philological comments. Chapter three comments on each literary unit of the Document, its relation to the biblical text, pseudepigraphic Jewish literature, and scribal school practices in ancient Mesopotamia. At the end of the book, the reader may consult Aramaic, Greek, and Syriac concordances. Sixteen plates of photographs of all the manuscripts facilitate the reader’s reference to the originals. The photographs of the Mount Athos manuscripts are published here for the very first time.

as the Messiah. 2. John was once a member of the ‘Dead Sea Sect’ (the ‘Qumran Community’) but he broke with it. 3. John offered a kind of baptismal ‘sacrament’ for forgiveness of sins ahead of the coming of God’s dominion, ushering people into a New Age of partially-realized eschatology