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Author: Andrey Medvedev

DOI: 10.1163/092598808X262605 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 Review of Central and East European Law 33 (2008) 205-222 Conditional (Contingent) Fees in the Russian Federation Andrey Medvedev Abstract In this article, the author discusses contemporary Russian judicial practice concerning

In: Review of Central and East European Law

Linguistic policy in the Russian Federation’s education system, particularly relating to the teaching of languages recognized as official at the level of its republics, has long been a subject of debate. The issue has sparked disagreements on the balancing between federal and regional competences

In: Review of Central and East European Law

401 Russian Federation Legislation of the Russian Federation on the Continental Shelf New legislation of the Russian Federation on its continental shelf of 1995 has been inspired to a large extent by the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOS Convention) to define the limits

In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law

5 The Law and Politics of the Maritime Boundary Delimitations of the Russian Federation: Part 2 Alex G. Oude Elferink Research Associate, Netherlands Institute for the Law of the Sea (NILOS), University of Utrecht ABSTRACT The maritime zones of the Russian Federation overlap with those of 12

In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law
This special issue of the REVIEW OF CENTRAL AND EAST EUROPEAN LAW compiles the material published under the head `Russian Federation Legislative Survey' in the six 1993 issues of the journal. It covers Russian legislation from the date of the Declaration of the State of Sovereignty of the RSFSR (12 June 1990) until the end of 1992. The principal watershed in this period was the disappearance of the USSR. This event had far-reaching consequences for Russian law, because of the two-tier character of law in the former Soviet Union: USSR law at the top, and underneath the subordinate legal systems of the individual union republics, including the RSFSR. These consequences can still be felt in many areas, and it will take considerable time and major efforts to replace all USSR law by new Russian enactments.
The Institute of East European Law and Russian Studies intends to bring this survey up to date as soon as possible. This is of course desirable for the practitioner, as well as for the academic user. It is felt, however, that it was imperative to build on a solid foundation, even if it meant some delay in the beginning. As new official sources of legislation emerge, as some already have in 1993, they will be included in the issues of the REVIEW OF CENTRAL AND EAST EUROPEAN LAW. The present survey is a reprint of the fourth issue of the REVIEW OF CENTRAL AND EAST EUROPEAN LAW (1994) and is available gratis to subscribers.
Author: Nicky Torode

International Journal on Minority and Group Rights 15 (2008) 179–193 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI 10.1163/157181108X332596 www.brill.nl/ijgr National Cultural Autonomy in the Russian Federation: Implementation and Impact Nicky Torode * Community Development offi cer, London, UK

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights
Author: Antonino Alì

The article examines the actions taken by the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) against the delegation of the Russian Federation in response to the crisis in Ukraine. In 2014 the Assembly decided to suspend some of the rights of the Russian delegation and menaced to annul the credentials of the delegation if an effective effort was not made on the part of Russia to sort out the situation and to reverse the annexation. The adoption of sanctions against the Russian delegation raised several legal issues related to the very existence of a sanctioning power of the CoE and in particular of the Assembly. The question is whether the powers to “penalize” the parliamentary delegation have been exercised by PACE in conformity with the Statute. The Statute of the CoE does not attribute sanctioning powers to the Assembly in order to target the states which are in breach of Article 3 or international law more generally. This power falls firmly in the hands of the Committee of Ministers as a way to put pressure on, deter, and eventually punish a state which has seriously violated the core of the principles of the CoE system. PACE, in the exercise of its functions, may certainly contribute to activating procedures to monitor the activities of the member states, but the last word is in the hands of the Committee which may suspend the rights of representation of a state and request that the offending state withdraw from the Committee entirely. The Statute plainly does not attribute this power to PACE. In the absence of the jurisdiction of a Court to deal with the problems caused by the lack of harmonisation between the sanctions adopted by the Committee of Ministers and the ones introduced by the Parliamentary Assembly through some modifications of the Rules of Procedure, the recent call for a 4th Summit of Heads of State and Government of the CoE by the Assembly in order to “preserve and further strengthen this unparalleled pan-European project currently threatened by divisions and a weakening of member States’ commitment” by “harmonising[…] the rules governing participation, representation and responsibilities of member States in both statutory organs, while fully respecting the autonomy of these bodies” should be welcomed.

In: The Italian Yearbook of International Law Online

533 The Law and Politics of the Maritime Boundary Delimitations of the Russian Federation: Part 1 Alex G. Oude Elferink External Associate, Netherlands Institute for the Law of the Sea (NILOS), University of Utrecht, The Netherlands ABSTRACT The maritime zones of Russian Federation overlap with

In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law
Author: Chester Brown

harassment not only disrupted the operations of Yukos but also contributed to its demise and thereby damaged Claimants’ investment’ (para. 820). Turning to the tax re-assessments for the years 2000 to 2004, the Tribunal had to determine whether these were ‘a legitimate exercise by the Russian Federation of

In: The Journal of World Investment & Trade
Author: Michiel Elst
This book traces the impact of the economic and political perestroika on the copyright law of the late USSR and the Russian Federation. The transformation of the administrative command economy into a market economy, the introduction of the rule of law and the adoption of a natural-law-view on human rights, the revolution in cultural policy, all influenced both the contents and the function of copyright law for the authors, entertainment and information industries and the consumers. The book provides a detailed analysis of the freedom of expression, and of copyright legislation in Russia, always with an eye on historic comparisons and evolutions . At the same time it gives a synthetic overview of the main changes in constitutional, civil and economic law in the last 15 years.