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53 Shahbazi, A. Shapur, Tārīḫ-e sāsānīān. Tarjome-ye baḫš-e sāsānīān az ketāb-e tārīḫ-e Ṭabarī va moqāyese-ye ān bā tārīḫ-e Balʿamī [Sasanian History. Translation of the Sasanian Section from the History of Ṭabari and its Commparission with the History of Balʿami], Tehran, Iran University Press

In: DABIR

historiographical tradition is considered to be one of the most important tex- tual sources for the reconstruction of Sāsānian history. Historians such as al-Ṭabarī, al- Masʿūdī or al-Thaʿālibī explicitly claimed to have used older material of Persian origin. The basis of their accounts seem to have been

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In: Iran and the Caucasus
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(975-1049) prominent Nestorian polyhistor. 975-1049). His work is an important source for Sasanian history. In 1002 he was made bishop of Bēṯ Nuhādrē in Adiabene, and in 1008 metropolitan of Nisibis (Naṣībīn). He wrote in Syriac and Arabic on theological issues. A

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online

Guidi’s most valuable discovery, the Syriac chronicle of an anonymous Nestorian Christian, contains otherwise non-attested details of late Sasanian history. Guidi recognized the significance of the synodal records of the Nestorian church for reconstructing the administration of

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online
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( Dēwal ), a commercial town and seaport in Sind, mentioned even in Sāsānian history; the Arabs on the occasion of the first Arab expedition (154) to India won a victory at Daibul and it was finally conquered by Muḥammad b. al-Ḳāsim in 934. The Arab geographers, some of whom had

in Encyclopaedia of Islam First Edition Online

The celebrative monument of Paikuli, located in the present-day province of Sulaimaniyah (Kurdistan, Iraq), was built at the southernmost edge of the Qaradagh range by the Sasanian king Narseh (293-302/3 ad). It marks the place where dignitaries of the Ērānšahr met the Sasanian sovereign to swear an oath of loyalty to him during a dynastic struggle. The bilingual inscription (Middle Persian and Parthian), originally carved on the walls of the monument, constitutes one of the most important primary sources for the early Sasanian history, despite its fragmentary state of preservation. From 2006 onwards an Italian team has been investigating the monument, conducting surveys in the valley of Paikuli and studying the materials now kept in the Slemani Museum (Sulaimaniyah), both activities continuing to the present day. The following paper aims to advance comprehension of the problematic Parthian block f1, one of the 19 recently-discovered inscribed blocks (Cereti, Terribili 2014), providing a new textual reconstruction and a synoptic reading of its content with the corresponding Middle Persian passages. Due to the peculiar epigraphic material and distinctive block shape, the analysis of f1 offers interesting insight into the distribution of the text on the wall and the related technical issues.

In: Annali Sezione Orientale

Guidi’s most valuable discovery, the Syriac chronicle of an anonymous Nestorian Christian, contains otherwise non-attested details of late Sasanian history. Guidi recognized the significance of the synodal records of the Nestorian church for reconstructing the administration of the empire.

In: Encyclopaedia Iranica Online
Author:

(975-1049) prominent Nestorian polyhistor. 975-1049). His work is an important source for Sasanian history. In 1002 he was made bishop of Bēṯ Nuhādrē in Adiabene, and in 1008 metropolitan of Nisibis (Naṣībīn). He wrote in Syriac and Arabic on theological issues.

In: Encyclopaedia Iranica Online
Author:

(Dēwal), a commercial town and seaport in Sind, mentioned even in Sāsānian history; the Arabs on the occasion of the first Arab expedition (154) to India won a victory at Daibul and it was finally conquered by Muḥammad b. al-Ḳāsim in 934. The Arab geographers, some of whom had personal acquaintance

Subrahmanyam). We understood that Sasanian history is recognized as important and crucial for our Roman and Islamic historian colleagues, but that it is constantly studied from the “edges,” based on the available sources. Islamic historians like al-Tabari present us with a view of Sasanian history from a

In: From Oxus to Euphrates