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No pre-existing bias in sailfin molly females, Poecilia latipinna , for a sword in males Klaudia Witte 1) & Karin B. Klink (Lehrstuhl für Verhaltensforschung, Universität Bielefeld) (Accepted: 7 February 2005) Summary The origination of female mate preference is still not well known and may

In: Behaviour

, including sailfin mollies, Poecilia latipinna (table 1). Microsatellite markers, however, combine the advantage of high variability with nuclear codominant inheritance and are thus most suitable for parentage analyses (Queller et al., 1993 ). Consequently, they have almost entirely replaced earlier

In: Animal Biology

The effects of male proximity, apparent size, and absolute size on female preference in the sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna R. David MacLaren 1) (Department of Biological Sciences, Kent State University - Tuscarawas, New Philadelphia, OH 44663, USA) (Accepted: 17 October 2006) Summary Female

In: Behaviour

beneficial when closely related species live in sympatry, but mate choice can be costly in the presence of predators. Male sailfin mollies are sexually para- sitized by gynogenetic Amazon mollies. Amazon mollies must mate with male sailfin mollies to initiate embryogenesis, but inheritance is maternal. We

In: Behaviour

Abstract

Females of many species receive male attention that reflects a conflict between the sexes over reproduction. Here we demonstrate that female sailfin mollies (Poecilia latipinna) suffer such a cost via a reduction of their feeding time in the presence of males. Female sailfin mollies spend significantly more time feeding when accompanied by an Amazon molly (P.formosa) or a sailfin molly female than when accompanied by a male sailfin molly. Furthermore, we show that male sexual harassment is size dependent and that small males impose a greater cost on females.

In: Behaviour

formosa ) is a hybrid of the Atlantic molly ( P. mexicana ) and sailfin molly ( P. latipinna ). Although none of these three species have sword tails, the two parental species differ in preference for swords on conspecifics. We further examined the variation in pre-existing bias within this species

In: Behaviour

erroneously accepting undesirable recipients (heterospecific females) (Reeve, 1989). Poecilia formosa (Amazon molly) is a gynogenetic, unisexual species that arose from a hybridization event between a female P. mexicana (Atlantic molly) and a male P. latipinna (sailfin molly) or an extinct ancestor (Avise et

In: Behaviour

(Basolo, 1996). The sword is only one of a variety of sexually dimorphic fin elaborations in poeciliid fishes. Male sailfin mollies, Poecilia latipinna , possess a large dorsal fin (sailfin) and perform an elaborate courtship display (Farr et al., 1986; Ptacek & Travis, 1996). Females prefer to associate

In: Behaviour

sailfin mollies ( Poecilia latipinna ) were presented simultaneously with a series of dummy male pairs that differed only in male body size (with dorsal fin size held constant). Females showed a significant directional preference for males of larger body size. However, when presented with the same five

In: Behaviour

systems. — Science 197: 215-223. Foran, C.M. & Ryan, M.J. (1994). Female–female competition in a unisexual/bisexual com- plex of mollies. — Copeia: 504-508. Gabor, C.R. (1999). Association patterns of Sailfin mollies ( Poecilia latipinna ): alternative hypotheses. — Behav. Ecol. Sociobiol. 46: 333

In: Behaviour