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Spatial Vision , Vol. 22, No. 5, pp. 409 – 424 (2009) © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2009. Also available online - www.brill.nl/sv Representation of space: image-like or sensorimotor? CHRISTOPH ZETZSCHE ∗ , JOHANNES WOLTER, CHRISTOPHER GALBRAITH and KERSTIN SCHILL Cognitive Neuroinformatics

In: Spatial Vision

1. Introduction Sensorimotor synchronization is the temporal coordination of a rhythmic movement with an external rhythm. This ubiquitous behavior has been studied by measuring the performance of musicians or dancers, or more commonly in the laboratory in the form of finger-tapping experiments in

In: Timing & Time Perception

simple movements such as finger taps, have been repeatedly used to study movement timing and sensorimotor synchronization. The use of computational modeling in conjunction with these paradigms provides a powerful approach for understanding the mechanisms underlying timing and synchronization. The current

In: Timing & Time Perception

Abstract from the 13th International Multisensory Research Forum, University of Oxford, UK, 2012. References Heron J. Hanson J. V. Whitaker D. ( 2009 ). Effect before cause: supramodal recalibration of sensorimotor timing , PLoS One 4 , e7681

In: Seeing and Perceiving

Repeated presentation of artificially induced delays between actions and events leads to shifts in participants’ subjective simultaneity towards the adapted lag. This sensorimotor temporal recalibration generalises across sensory modalities, presumably via a shift in the motor component. Here we examined two overlapping questions regarding (1) the level of representation of temporal recalibration (by testing whether it also generalises across limbs) and (2) the neural underpinning of the shift in the motor component (by comparing adaption magnitude in the foot relative to the hand). An adaption-test paradigm was used, with hand or foot adaptation, and same-limb and cross-limb test phases that used a synchrony judgement task. By demonstrating that temporal recalibration occurs in the foot, we confirmed that it is a robust motor phenomenon. Shifts in the distribution of participants’ synchrony responses were quantified using a detection-theoretic model of the SJ task, where a shift of both boundaries together gives a stronger indication that the effect is not simply a result of decision bias. The results showed a significant shift in both boundaries in the same-limb conditions, whereas there was only a shift of the higher boundary in the cross-limb conditions. These two patterns most likely reflect a genuine shift in neural timing, and a criterion shift, respectively.

In: Seeing and Perceiving

, maintaining and controlling balance can be considered a sensorimotor skill that is intertwined with numerous cognitive processes including multisensory integration, visuomotor and spatial cognition, spatial navigation, self-motion and self-perception, memory, attention, and executive control (Dieterich and

In: Multisensory Research

deviations. Although both prediction and adaptation recruit a mixture of automatic sensorimotor processes and deliberate cognitive operations, in the current article we focus on a deliberate form of temporal prediction (which is assumed to rely upon working memory and mental imagery; Keller, 2012 ) and an

In: Timing & Time Perception

Multisensory Research 26 Supplement (2013) 212–213 brill.com/msr Poster Presentation Concurrent sensorimotor adaptation for different delays measured via a tapping task Yoshimori Sugano 1 , ∗ , Mirjam Keetels 2 and Jean Vroomen 2 1 Kyushu Sangyo University, Japan 2 Tilburg University, The

In: Multisensory Research
Author: J.L. Dubbeldam

INTRATELENCEPHALIC SENSORIMOTOR CIRCUITS IN BIRDS - WHAT HAVE FEEDING AND VOCALIZATION IN COMMON? by J.L. DUBBELDAM (Institute of Evolutionary and Ecological Sciences, Leiden University, P.O.B. 9516, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands) ABSTRACT Specific activities, like feeding and vocalization

In: Netherlands Journal of Zoology

When using tools effects in body space and distant space often do not correspond or are even in conflict. The ideomotor principle holds that actors select, initiate and execute movements by activating the anticipatory codes of the movements’ sensory effects (Greenwald, ; James, ). These may be representations of body-related effects and/or representations of more distal effects. Previous studies have demonstrated that distant action effects dominate action control, while body-related effects are attenuated (e.g., Müsseler and Sutter, ). In two experiments, participants performed closed-loop controlled movements on a covered digitizer tablet to control a cursor on a monitor. Different gains perturbed the relation between hand and cursor amplitude, so that the hand amplitude varied and the cursor amplitude remained constant, and vice versa. Within a block the location of amplitude perturbation randomly varied (low predictability) or not (high predictability). In Experiment 1 both trajectories of hand and cursor followed the same linear path, in Experiment 2 a linear hand trajectory produced a curved cursor trajectory on the monitor. When participants were asked to evaluate their hand movement, they were extremely uncertain about their trajectories. Both, predictability of amplitude perturbation and shape of cursor trajectory modulated the awareness of one’s own hand movements. We will discuss whether the low awareness of proximal action effects originates from an insufficient quality of the humans’ tactile and proprioceptive system or from an insufficient spatial reconstruction of this information in memory.

In: Seeing and Perceiving